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Eczematoid dermatitis

MedGen UID:
3968
Concept ID:
C0013595
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Eczema; Eczematous rash
SNOMED CT: Eczema (43116000)
 
HPO: HP:0000964

Definition

Eczema is a form of dermatitis that is characterized by scaly, pruritic, erythematous lesions located on flexural surfaces. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Mycosis fungoides
MedGen UID:
7771
Concept ID:
C0026948
Neoplastic Process
Mycosis fungoides is a malignant T-cell lymphoma of the skin, first reported (and named) by Alibert (1835). Sezary syndrome is a leukemic variant of mycosis fungoides defined by erythroderma with greater than 80% of the skin showing redness, adenopathy and greater than 1,000 circulating Sezary cells/microliter with a CD4+CD26- or CD4+CD7- phenotype. Sezary cells have a type 2 helper T cell cytokine profile. Sezary syndrome has a median overall survival time of only 2.4 years in patients with Sezary cells at a density of greater than 10,000 cells/microliter or 5.4 years in patients with 1,000-10,000 Sezary cells/microliter. Mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome are the most common cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Sezary syndrome can arise de novo or can appear following years of chronic mycosis fungoides. Both are thought to arise from clonal expansion of CD4+ helper T cells responding to chronic antigen stimulation (summary by Wang et al., 2015).
Extramammary Paget disease
MedGen UID:
45280
Concept ID:
C0030186
Neoplastic Process
A rare skin tumor characterized by predominantly intraepithelial growth of an adenocarcinoma which may either arise primarily in the skin (primary extramammary Paget disease) or result from intraepithelial spread of a visceral carcinoma (secondary extramammary Paget disease). The lesion is typically located in the anogenital region, presenting as a scaly, oozing, pruritic or painful erythematous plaque often resembling eczema. It may exhibit an invasive component with a significant risk of lymph node metastasis.
Pelger-Huët anomaly
MedGen UID:
10617
Concept ID:
C0030779
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal dominant inherited condition caused by mutations in the lamin B receptor gene. It is characterized by defects in the neutrophil lobulation, resulting in the presence of dumbbell-shaped neutrophils with bilobed nuclei in the peripheral blood smear.
Phenylketonuria
MedGen UID:
19244
Concept ID:
C0031485
Disease or Syndrome
Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) deficiency results in intolerance to the dietary intake of the essential amino acid phenylalanine and produces a spectrum of disorders. The risk of adverse outcome varies based on the degree of PAH deficiency. Without effective therapy, most individuals with severe PAH deficiency, known as classic PKU, develop profound and irreversible intellectual disability. Affected individuals on an unrestricted diet who have phenylalanine levels above normal but below 1,200 µmol/L (20 mg/dL) are at much lower risk for impaired cognitive development in the absence of treatment.
Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome
MedGen UID:
21921
Concept ID:
C0043194
Disease or Syndrome
The WAS-related disorders, which include Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT), and X-linked congenital neutropenia (XLN), are a spectrum of disorders of hematopoietic cells, with predominant defects of platelets and lymphocytes caused by pathogenic variants in WAS. WAS-related disorders usually present in infancy. Affected males have thrombocytopenia with intermittent mucosal bleeding, bloody diarrhea, and intermittent or chronic petechiae and purpura; eczema; and recurrent bacterial and viral infections, particularly of the ear. At least 40% of those who survive the early complications develop one or more autoimmune conditions including hemolytic anemia, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, immune-mediated neutropenia, rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis, and immune-mediated damage to the kidneys and liver. Individuals with a WAS-related disorder, particularly those who have been exposed to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are at increased risk of developing lymphomas, which often occur in unusual, extranodal locations including the brain, lung, or gastrointestinal tract. Males with XLT have thrombocytopenia with small platelets; other complications of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, including eczema and immune dysfunction, are usually mild or absent. Males with XLN have congenital neutropenia, myeloid dysplasia, and lymphoid cell abnormalities.
Ichthyosis vulgaris
MedGen UID:
38217
Concept ID:
C0079584
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic characteristics of ichthyosis vulgaris include palmar hyperlinearity, keratosis pilaris, and a fine scale that is most prominent over the lower abdomen, arms, and legs. Marked presentation includes prominent scaling, whereas mild presentation consists of palmar hyperlinearity, keratosis pilaris, and, in some cases, fine scaling (summary by Smith et al., 2006).
T-lymphocyte deficiency
MedGen UID:
101814
Concept ID:
C0152094
Disease or Syndrome
T-cell immunodeficiency with thymic aplasia (TIDTA) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is often detected at birth through newborn SCID screening with the finding of decreased T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs). Affected individuals have selective hypo- or aplasia of the thymus, which results in T-cell immunodeficiency due to impaired T-cell development and increased susceptibility to viral infections. The phenotype is similar to T-/B+/NK+ SCID. Some patients may die in childhood; thymus transplantation may be curative (summary by Du et al., 2019).
Hypohidrotic X-linked ectodermal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
57890
Concept ID:
C0162359
Disease or Syndrome
Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is characterized by hypotrichosis (sparseness of scalp and body hair), hypohidrosis (reduced ability to sweat), and hypodontia (congenital absence of teeth). The cardinal features of classic HED become obvious during childhood. The scalp hair is thin, lightly pigmented, and slow growing. Sweating, although present, is greatly deficient, leading to episodes of hyperthermia until the affected individual or family acquires experience with environmental modifications to control temperature. Only a few abnormally formed teeth erupt, at a later-than-average age. Physical growth and psychomotor development are otherwise within normal limits. Mild HED is characterized by mild manifestations of any or all the characteristic features.
Dubowitz syndrome
MedGen UID:
59797
Concept ID:
C0175691
Disease or Syndrome
Dubowitz syndrome (DS) is a rare multiple congenital syndrome characterized primarly by growth retardation, microcephaly, distinctive facial dysmorphism, cutaneous eczema, a mild to severe intellectual deficit and genital abnormalities.
Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome
MedGen UID:
61231
Concept ID:
C0175694
Disease or Syndrome
Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a congenital multiple-anomaly / cognitive impairment syndrome caused by an abnormality in cholesterol metabolism resulting from deficiency of the enzyme 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) reductase. It is characterized by prenatal and postnatal growth restriction, microcephaly, moderate-to-severe intellectual disability, and multiple major and minor malformations. The malformations include distinctive facial features, cleft palate, cardiac defects, underdeveloped external genitalia in males, postaxial polydactyly, and 2-3 syndactyly of the toes. The clinical spectrum is wide; individuals with normal development and only minor malformations have been described.
gamma-Glutamyltransferase deficiency
MedGen UID:
82813
Concept ID:
C0268524
Disease or Syndrome
Level of glutathione in the urine above the upper limit of normal.
Prolidase deficiency
MedGen UID:
120647
Concept ID:
C0268532
Disease or Syndrome
Prolidase deficiency is characterized by skin lesions (typically severe, chronic, recalcitrant, and painful skin ulcers of the lower extremities and telangiectasias of the face and hands), recurrent infections (particularly of the skin and respiratory tract), dysmorphic facial features, variable intellectual disability, and organomegaly (typically splenomegaly but occasionally associated with hepatomegaly) with elevated liver enzymes. Skeletal anomalies, chronic pulmonary disease, anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypergammaglobulinemia, and hypocomplementemia are observed in a minority of affected individuals. An association between prolidase deficiency and autoimmune conditions – particularly systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) – has been described.
Propionic acidemia
MedGen UID:
75694
Concept ID:
C0268579
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of propionic acidemia (PA) ranges from neonatal-onset to late-onset disease. Neonatal-onset PA, the most common form, is characterized by a healthy newborn with poor feeding and decreased arousal in the first few days of life, followed by progressive encephalopathy of unexplained origin. Without prompt diagnosis and management, this is followed by progressive encephalopathy manifesting as lethargy, seizures, or coma that can result in death. It is frequently accompanied by metabolic acidosis with anion gap, lactic acidosis, ketonuria, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and cytopenias. Individuals with late-onset PA may remain asymptomatic and suffer a metabolic crisis under catabolic stress (e.g., illness, surgery, fasting) or may experience a more insidious onset with the development of multiorgan complications including vomiting, protein intolerance, failure to thrive, hypotonia, developmental delays or regression, movement disorders, or cardiomyopathy. Isolated cardiomyopathy can be observed on rare occasion in the absence of clinical metabolic decompensation or neurocognitive deficits. Manifestations of neonatal and late-onset PA over time can include growth impairment, intellectual disability, seizures, basal ganglia lesions, pancreatitis, and cardiomyopathy. Other rarely reported complications include optic atrophy, hearing loss, premature ovarian insufficiency, and chronic renal failure.
Sulfite oxidase deficiency
MedGen UID:
78695
Concept ID:
C0268624
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency ranges from classic early-onset (severe) disease to late-onset (mild) disease. Classic ISOD is characterized in the first few hours to days of life by intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, and rapidly progressive encephalopathy manifest as abnormal tone (especially opisthotonus, spastic quadriplegia, and pyramidal signs) followed by progressive microcephaly and profound intellectual disability. Lens subluxation or dislocation, another characteristic finding, may be evident after the newborn period. Children usually die during the first few months of life. Late-onset ISOD manifests between ages six and 18 months and is characterized by ectopia lentis (variably present), developmental delay/regression, movement disorder characterized by dystonia and choreoathetosis, ataxia, and (rarely) acute hemiplegia as a result of metabolic stroke. The clinical course may be progressive or episodic. In the episodic form encephalopathy, dystonia, choreoathetosis, and/or ataxia are intermittent.
Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus secretory diarrhea syndrome
MedGen UID:
83339
Concept ID:
C0342288
Disease or Syndrome
IPEX (immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked) syndrome is characterized by systemic autoimmunity, typically beginning in the first year of life. Presentation is most commonly the clinical triad of watery diarrhea, endocrinopathy (most commonly insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus), and eczematous dermatitis. Most children have other autoimmune phenomena including cytopenias, autoimmune hepatitis, or nephropathy; lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, alopecia, arthritis, and lung disease related to immune dysregulation have all been observed. Fetal presentation of IPEX includes hydrops, echogenic bowel, skin desquamation, IUGR, and fetal akinesia. Without aggressive immunosuppression or bone marrow transplantation, the majority of affected males die within the first one to two years of life from metabolic derangements, severe malabsorption, or sepsis; a few with a milder phenotype have survived into the second or third decade of life.
Follicular atrophoderma and basal cell epitheliomata
MedGen UID:
87539
Concept ID:
C0346104
Neoplastic Process
Bazex-Dupre-Christol syndrome (BDCS) is an X-linked dominant disorder characterized by a triad of congenital hypotrichosis, follicular atrophoderma affecting the dorsa of the hands and feet, the face, and extensor surfaces of the elbows or knees, and the development of basal cell neoplasms, including basal cell nevi and basal cell carcinomas from the second decade onward (Yung and Newton-Bishop, 2005). Rombo syndrome (180730) has similar features, but shows autosomal dominant inheritance.
Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome
MedGen UID:
220983
Concept ID:
C1303073
Disease or Syndrome
Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NCBRS) is characterized by sparse scalp hair, prominence of the inter-phalangeal joints and distal phalanges due to decreased subcutaneous fat, characteristic coarse facial features, microcephaly, seizures, and developmental delay / intellectual disability. Seizures are of various types and can be difficult to manage. Developmental delay / intellectual disability (ID) is severe in nearly a half, moderate in a third, and mild in the remainder. Nearly a third never develop speech or language skills.
Thrombocytopenia 1
MedGen UID:
326416
Concept ID:
C1839163
Disease or Syndrome
The WAS-related disorders, which include Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT), and X-linked congenital neutropenia (XLN), are a spectrum of disorders of hematopoietic cells, with predominant defects of platelets and lymphocytes caused by pathogenic variants in WAS. WAS-related disorders usually present in infancy. Affected males have thrombocytopenia with intermittent mucosal bleeding, bloody diarrhea, and intermittent or chronic petechiae and purpura; eczema; and recurrent bacterial and viral infections, particularly of the ear. At least 40% of those who survive the early complications develop one or more autoimmune conditions including hemolytic anemia, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, immune-mediated neutropenia, rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis, and immune-mediated damage to the kidneys and liver. Individuals with a WAS-related disorder, particularly those who have been exposed to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are at increased risk of developing lymphomas, which often occur in unusual, extranodal locations including the brain, lung, or gastrointestinal tract. Males with XLT have thrombocytopenia with small platelets; other complications of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, including eczema and immune dysfunction, are usually mild or absent. Males with XLN have congenital neutropenia, myeloid dysplasia, and lymphoid cell abnormalities.
IgE responsiveness, atopic
MedGen UID:
327063
Concept ID:
C1840253
Disease or Syndrome
Atopy is an allergic disorder characterized by immunoglobulin E (IgE) responses to environmental proteins that are otherwise innocuous and predominantly found in plant pollen and house dust. It is the major cause of asthma (see 600807), rhinitis (see 607154), and eczema (see 603165) in children and young adults (summary by Young et al., 1992).
Zinc deficiency, transient neonatal
MedGen UID:
330858
Concept ID:
C1842486
Disease or Syndrome
Transient neonatal zinc deficiency occurs in breast-fed infants as a consequence of low milk zinc concentration in their nursing mothers, which cannot be corrected by maternal zinc supplementation. A large amount of zinc, an essential trace mineral, is required for normal growth particularly in infants, and breast milk normally contains adequate zinc to meet the requirement for infants up to 4 to 6 months of age. Zinc deficiency can lead to dermatitis, alopecia, decreased growth, and impaired immune function. The disorder shows autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance (summary by Chowanadisai et al., 2006). Some aspects of TNZD resemble the more severe disorder acrodermatitis enteropathica (AEZ; 201100), an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation in the zinc transporter SLC39A4 (607059). However, infants with transient neonatal zinc deficiency do not require zinc supplementation following weaning and have normal zinc absorption, whereas those with AEZ require lifelong zinc supplementation (summary by Chowanadisai et al., 2006).
Granulomatous disease, chronic, X-linked
MedGen UID:
336165
Concept ID:
C1844376
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival.
X-linked severe congenital neutropenia
MedGen UID:
335314
Concept ID:
C1845987
Disease or Syndrome
The WAS-related disorders, which include Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT), and X-linked congenital neutropenia (XLN), are a spectrum of disorders of hematopoietic cells, with predominant defects of platelets and lymphocytes caused by pathogenic variants in WAS. WAS-related disorders usually present in infancy. Affected males have thrombocytopenia with intermittent mucosal bleeding, bloody diarrhea, and intermittent or chronic petechiae and purpura; eczema; and recurrent bacterial and viral infections, particularly of the ear. At least 40% of those who survive the early complications develop one or more autoimmune conditions including hemolytic anemia, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, immune-mediated neutropenia, rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis, and immune-mediated damage to the kidneys and liver. Individuals with a WAS-related disorder, particularly those who have been exposed to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are at increased risk of developing lymphomas, which often occur in unusual, extranodal locations including the brain, lung, or gastrointestinal tract. Males with XLT have thrombocytopenia with small platelets; other complications of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, including eczema and immune dysfunction, are usually mild or absent. Males with XLN have congenital neutropenia, myeloid dysplasia, and lymphoid cell abnormalities.
Roifman syndrome
MedGen UID:
375801
Concept ID:
C1846059
Disease or Syndrome
Roifman syndrome is a multisystem disorder characterized by growth retardation, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, retinal dystrophy, distinctive facial dysmorphism, and immunodeficiency (summary by de Vries et al., 2006).
Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome type 2B
MedGen UID:
339548
Concept ID:
C1846545
Disease or Syndrome
Caspase 8 deficiency is a syndrome of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly, marginal elevation of 'double-negative T cells' (DNT; T-cell receptor alpha/beta+, CD4-/CD8-), defective FAS-induced apoptosis, and defective T-, B-, and natural killer (NK)-cell activation, with recurrent bacterial and viral infections (summary by Madkaikar et al., 2011).
Immunodeficiency due to CD25 deficiency
MedGen UID:
377894
Concept ID:
C1853392
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-41 is an autosomal recessive complex disorder of immune dysregulation. Affected individuals present in infancy with recurrent viral, fungal, and bacterial infections, lymphadenopathy, and variable autoimmune features, such as autoimmune enteropathy and eczematous skin lesions. Immunologic studies show a defect in T-cell regulation (summary by Goudy et al., 2013).
Granulomatous disease, chronic, autosomal recessive, cytochrome b-positive, type 2
MedGen UID:
383869
Concept ID:
C1856245
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival.
Granulomatous disease, chronic, autosomal recessive, cytochrome b-positive, type 1
MedGen UID:
341102
Concept ID:
C1856251
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival.
Granulomatous disease, chronic, autosomal recessive, cytochrome b-negative
MedGen UID:
383872
Concept ID:
C1856255
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival.
Celiac disease, susceptibility to, 1
MedGen UID:
395227
Concept ID:
C1859310
Finding
Celiac disease is a systemic autoimmune disease that can be associated with gastrointestinal findings (diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain and distension, bloating, vomiting, and weight loss) and/or highly variable non-gastrointestinal findings (dermatitis herpetiformis, chronic fatigue, joint pain/inflammation, iron deficiency anemia, migraines, depression, attention-deficit disorder, epilepsy, osteoporosis/osteopenia, infertility and/or recurrent fetal loss, vitamin deficiencies, short stature, failure to thrive, delayed puberty, dental enamel defects, and autoimmune disorders). Classic celiac disease, characterized by mild to severe gastrointestinal symptoms, is less common than non-classic celiac disease, characterized by absence of gastrointestinal symptoms.
ADULT syndrome
MedGen UID:
400232
Concept ID:
C1863204
Disease or Syndrome
The TP63-related disorders comprise six overlapping phenotypes: Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome (which includes Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome). Acro-dermo-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome. Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate syndrome 3 (EEC3). Limb-mammary syndrome. Split-hand/foot malformation type 4 (SHFM4). Isolated cleft lip/cleft palate (orofacial cleft 8). Individuals typically have varying combinations of ectodermal dysplasia (hypohidrosis, nail dysplasia, sparse hair, tooth abnormalities), cleft lip/palate, split-hand/foot malformation/syndactyly, lacrimal duct obstruction, hypopigmentation, hypoplastic breasts and/or nipples, and hypospadias. Findings associated with a single phenotype include ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum (tissue strands that completely or partially fuse the upper and lower eyelids), skin erosions especially on the scalp associated with areas of scarring, and alopecia, trismus, and excessive freckling.
Dermatitis, atopic
MedGen UID:
350353
Concept ID:
C1864155
Disease or Syndrome
Koolen-de Vries syndrome
MedGen UID:
355853
Concept ID:
C1864871
Disease or Syndrome
Koolen-de Vries syndrome (KdVS) is characterized by developmental delay / intellectual disability, neonatal/childhood hypotonia, dysmorphisms, congenital malformations, and behavioral features. Psychomotor developmental delay is noted in all individuals from an early age. The majority of individuals with KdVS function in the mild-to-moderate range of intellectual disability. Other findings include speech and language delay (100%), epilepsy (~33%), congenital heart defects (25%-50%), renal and urologic anomalies (25%-50%), and cryptorchidism (71% of males). Behavior in most is described as friendly, amiable, and cooperative.
Sporadic porphyria cutanea tarda
MedGen UID:
357391
Concept ID:
C1867968
Disease or Syndrome
De Verneuil et al. (1978) classified porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), the most common type of porphyria, into 2 types: type I, or 'sporadic' type, associated with approximately 50% level of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD; 613521) in liver (Elder et al., 1978; Felsher et al., 1982), and type II, or 'familial' type (176100), characterized by 50% deficient activity of the same enzyme in many tissues (Kushner et al., 1976; Elder et al., 1980). Type I is the most common form of PCT, comprising 70 to 80% of cases. The causes of the deficiency are often unclear and are probably multifactorial (review by Lambrecht et al., 2007).
Intellectual disability, autosomal recessive 5
MedGen UID:
370849
Concept ID:
C1970199
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Any autosomal recessive non-syndromic intellectual disability in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the NSUN2 gene.
Chromosome 2q37 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
419169
Concept ID:
C2931817
Disease or Syndrome
Patients with chromosome 2q37 deletion syndrome show highly variable clinical manifestations likely resulting from different deletion sizes and deletions of different genes. Variable clinical features included brachydactyly type E (BDE), affecting the metacarpals and metatarsals (in about 50% of patients), short stature, mild to moderate intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities, and dysmorphic facial features. However, many individuals with deletions do not show cognitive deficits (summary by Villavicencio-Lorini et al., 2013, Wheeler et al., 2014, Jean-Marcais et al., 2015).
Ogden syndrome
MedGen UID:
477078
Concept ID:
C3275447
Disease or Syndrome
Ogden syndrome (OGDNS) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by postnatal growth failure, severely delayed psychomotor development, variable dysmorphic features, and hypotonia. Many patients also have cardiac malformations or arrhythmias (summary by Popp et al., 2015).
Autoimmune enteropathy and endocrinopathy - susceptibility to chronic infections syndrome
MedGen UID:
481620
Concept ID:
C3279990
Disease or Syndrome
IMD31C is a disorder of immunologic dysregulation with highly variable manifestations resulting from autosomal dominant gain-of-function mutations in STAT1 (600555). Most patients present in infancy or early childhood with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). Other highly variable features include recurrent bacterial, viral, fungal, and mycoplasmal infections, disseminated dimorphic fungal infections, enteropathy with villous atrophy, and autoimmune disorders, such as hypothyroidism or diabetes mellitus. A subset of patients show apparently nonimmunologic features, including osteopenia, delayed puberty, and intracranial aneurysms. Laboratory studies show increased activation of gamma-interferon (IFNG; 147570)-mediated inflammation (summary by Uzel et al., 2013 and Sampaio et al., 2013).
Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
482631
Concept ID:
C3281001
Disease or Syndrome
Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome-2 (WAS2) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by onset of recurrent infections in infancy. Other features include thrombocytopenia with normal platelet volume and eczema. Laboratory studies show decreased CD8+ T cells, variably increased Ig, particularly IgE, low B cells, aberrant function of T and NK cells, and impaired T-cell migration. The cellular abnormalities are thought to result from defective F-actin polymerization. Death in early childhood may occur; hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is curative (summary by Lanzi et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, see WAS (301000).
Noonan syndrome 8
MedGen UID:
815563
Concept ID:
C3809233
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Combined immunodeficiency due to CD3gamma deficiency
MedGen UID:
816437
Concept ID:
C3810107
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-17 (IMD17) is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by highly variable clinical severity. Some patients have onset of severe recurrent infections in early infancy that may be lethal, whereas others may be only mildly affected or essentially asymptomatic into young adulthood. More severely affected patients may have evidence of autoimmune disease or enteropathy. The immunologic pattern is similar among patients, showing partial T-cell lymphopenia, particularly of cytotoxic CD8 (see 186910)-positive cells, decreased amounts of the CD3 complex, and impaired proliferative responses to T-cell receptor (TCR)-dependent stimuli. B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and immunoglobulins are usually normal. Although thymic output of functional naive T cells early in life is decreased, polyclonal expansion of functional memory T cells is substantial. The phenotype in some patients is reminiscent of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) (summary by Timon et al. (1993) and Recio et al. (2007)).
Vasculitis due to ADA2 deficiency
MedGen UID:
854497
Concept ID:
C3887654
Disease or Syndrome
Adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency (DADA2) is a complex systemic autoinflammatory disorder in which vasculopathy/vasculitis, dysregulated immune function, and/or hematologic abnormalities may predominate. Inflammatory features include intermittent fevers, rash (often livedo racemosa/reticularis), and musculoskeletal involvement (myalgia/arthralgia, arthritis, myositis). Vasculitis, which usually begins before age ten years, may manifest as early-onset ischemic (lacunar) and/or hemorrhagic strokes, or as cutaneous or systemic polyarteritis nodosa. Hypertension and hepatosplenomegaly are often found. More severe involvement may lead to progressive central neurologic deficits (dysarthria, ataxia, cranial nerve palsies, cognitive impairment) or to ischemic injury to the kidney, intestine, and/or digits. Dysregulation of immune function can lead to immunodeficiency or autoimmunity of varying severity; lymphadenopathy may be present and some affected individuals have had lymphoproliferative disease. Hematologic disorders may begin early in life or in late adulthood, and can include lymphopenia, neutropenia, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, or pancytopenia. Of note, both interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variability (e.g., in age of onset, frequency and severity of manifestations) can be observed; also, individuals with biallelic ADA2 pathogenic variants may remain asymptomatic until adulthood or may never develop clinical manifestations of DADA2.
Immunodeficiency 23
MedGen UID:
862808
Concept ID:
C4014371
Disease or Syndrome
IMD23 is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by onset of recurrent infections, usually respiratory or cutaneous, in early childhood. Immune workup usually shows neutropenia, lymphopenia, eosinophilia, and increased serum IgE or IgA. Neutrophil chemotactic defects have also been reported. Infectious agents include bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Many patients develop atopic dermatitis, eczema, and other signs of autoinflammation. Affected individuals may also show developmental delay or cognitive impairment of varying severity (summary by Bjorksten and Lundmark, 1976 and Zhang et al., 2014).
Polyglucosan body myopathy type 1
MedGen UID:
863042
Concept ID:
C4014605
Disease or Syndrome
Polyglucosan body myopathy-1 (PGBM1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset in childhood of progressive proximal muscle weakness, resulting in difficulties in ambulation. Most patients also develop progressive dilated cardiomyopathy, which may necessitate cardiac transplant in severe cases. A small subset of patients present with severe immunodeficiency and a hyperinflammatory state in very early childhood (summary by Boisson et al., 2012 and Nilsson et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Polyglucosan Body Myopathy See also PGBM2 (616199), caused by mutation in the GYG1 gene (603942) on chromosome 3q24.
STAT3-related early-onset multisystem autoimmune disease
MedGen UID:
863232
Concept ID:
C4014795
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile-onset multisystem autoimmune disease-1 is characterized by early childhood onset of a spectrum of autoimmune disorders affecting multiple organs. Common manifestations include insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and autoimmune enteropathy, or celiac disease, and autoimmune hematologic disorders. Other features include short stature and nonspecific dermatitis. More variable features include hypothyroidism, autoimmune arthritis, and delayed puberty. Some patients may show recurrent infections. The disorder results from an inborn error of cytokine signaling (summary by Flanagan et al., 2014 and Milner et al., 2015). Genetic Heterogeneity of Infantile-Onset Multisystem Autoimmune Disease See also ADMIO2 (617006), caused by mutation in the ZAP70 gene (176947) on chromosome 2q12, and ADMIO3 (620430), caused by mutation in the CBLB gene (604491) on chromosome 3q13.
Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome due to CTLA4 haploinsufficiency
MedGen UID:
863651
Concept ID:
C4015214
Disease or Syndrome
Immune dysregulation with autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, and lymphoproliferation (IDAIL) is an autosomal dominant complex immune disorder with highly variable presentation and clinical manifestations. Prominent features include recurrent infections often associated with hypogammaglobulinemia, autoimmune features such as autoimmune cytopenias, and abnormal lymphocytic infiltration of nonlymphoid organs, including the lungs, brain, and gastrointestinal tract, resulting in enteropathy. Laboratory studies often show lymphopenia and abnormal T and B cell subsets. The variable features are a result of impaired function of Treg cells, which play a role in immune homeostasis (summary by Kuehn et al., 2014; Schwab et al., 2018, and Lopez-Nevado et al., 2021). The disorder shows overlapping features with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS); for a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ALPS, see 601859.
DDX41-related hematologic malignancy predisposition syndrome
MedGen UID:
895780
Concept ID:
C4225174
Finding
DDX41-associated familial myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia (MDS/AML) is characterized by an increased risk of myeloid neoplasms, lymphoid neoplasms, adult-onset single- or multiple-lineage cytopenias (including aplastic anemia), and red blood cell macrocytosis. The most common myeloid neoplasms include MDS, AML, and therapy-related myeloid neoplasms. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and myeloproliferative neoplasms are less common. Lymphoid neoplasms include non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
Intellectual disability, X-linked, syndromic 33
MedGen UID:
895979
Concept ID:
C4225418
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked syndromic intellectual developmental disorder-33 (MRXS33) is an X-linked recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features (summary by O'Rawe et al., 2015).
Ectodermal dysplasia 12, hypohidrotic/hair/tooth/nail type
MedGen UID:
934583
Concept ID:
C4310616
Disease or Syndrome
Some ectodermal dysplasias are here classified as congenital disorders characterized by abnormal development in 2 or more ectodermal structures (hair, nails, teeth, and sweat glands) without other systemic findings. Hypohidrotic, or anhidrotic, ectodermal dysplasia (HED/EDA) is characterized by a triad of signs comprising sparse hair (hypotrichosis), abnormal or missing teeth (anodontia or hypodontia), and inability to sweat (anhidrosis or hypohidrosis). Typical clinical manifestations also include dryness of the skin, eyes, airways, and mucous membranes presumably due to the defective development of several exocrine glands. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia can be associated with dysmorphic features (forehead bumps, rings under the eyes, everted nose, and prominent lips) and occasionally with absent nipples (summary by Cluzeau et al., 2011).
Lung disease, immunodeficiency, and chromosome breakage syndrome;
MedGen UID:
934620
Concept ID:
C4310653
Disease or Syndrome
LICS is an autosomal recessive chromosome breakage syndrome characterized by failure to thrive in infancy, immune deficiency, and fatal progressive pediatric lung disease induced by viral infection. Some patients may have mild dysmorphic features (summary by van der Crabben et al., 2016).
Short stature-brachydactyly-obesity-global developmental delay syndrome
MedGen UID:
934656
Concept ID:
C4310689
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic, multiple congenital anomalies syndrome characterized by short stature, hand brachydactyly with hypoplastic distal phalanges, global development delay, intellectual disability, and more variably seizures, obesity, and craniofacial dysmorphism that includes microcephaly, high forehead, flat face, hypertelorism, deep set eyes, flat nasal bridge, averted nostrils, long philtrum, thin lip vermilion, and short neck.
Bone marrow failure syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
934711
Concept ID:
C4310744
Disease or Syndrome
Bone marrow failure syndrome-3 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset of pancytopenia in early childhood. Patients may have additional variable nonspecific somatic abnormalities, including poor growth, microcephaly, and skin anomalies (summary by Tummala et al., 2016). BMFS3 has a distinct phenotype and may include features that overlap with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS1; 260400), such as pancreatic insufficiency and short stature, and with dyskeratosis congenita (see, e.g., DKCA1, 127550), such as dental and hair abnormalities and shortened telomeres. In addition, some patients may have joint and skeletal abnormalities, impaired development, and retinal dysplasia (summary by D'Amours et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of BMFS, see BMFS1 (614675).
Immunodeficiency 51
MedGen UID:
934770
Concept ID:
C4310803
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-51 (IMD51) is an autosomal recessive primary immune deficiency that is usually characterized by onset of chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis in the first years of life. Most patients also show recurrent Staphylococcal skin infections, and may show increased susceptibility to chronic bacterial respiratory infections. Patient cells show a lack of cellular responses to stimulation with certain IL17 isoforms, including IL17A (603149), IL17F (606496), IL17A/F, and IL17E (IL25; 605658) (summary by Levy et al., 2016).
SIN3A-related intellectual disability syndrome due to a point mutation
MedGen UID:
934771
Concept ID:
C4310804
Disease or Syndrome
Witteveen-Kolk syndrome (WITKOS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with characteristic distinctive facial features, microcephaly, short stature, and mildly impaired intellectual development with delayed cognitive and motor development and subtle anomalies on MRI-brain imaging (summary by Balasubramanian et al., 2021).
SRD5A3-congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
1392124
Concept ID:
C4317224
Disease or Syndrome
SRD5A3-congenital disorder of glycosylation (SRD5A3-CDG, formerly known as congenital disorder of glycosylation type Iq) is an inherited condition that causes neurological and vision problems and other signs and symptoms. The pattern and severity of this condition's features vary widely among affected individuals.\n\nIndividuals with SRD5A3-CDG typically develop signs and symptoms of the condition during infancy or early childhood. Most individuals with SRD5A3-CDG have intellectual disability, vision problems, unusual facial features,low muscle tone (hypotonia), and problems with coordination and balance (ataxia). \n\nVision problems in SRD5A3-CDG often include involuntary side-side movements of the eyes (nystagmus), a gap or hole in one of the structures of the eye (coloboma), underdevelopment of the nerves that carry signals between the eyes and the brain(optic nerve hypoplasia), or vision loss early in life (early-onset severe retinal dystrophy). Over time, affected individuals may develop clouding of the lenses of the eyes (cataracts) or increased pressure in the eyes (glaucoma).\n\nOther features of SRD5A3-CDG can include skin rash, unusually small red blood cells (microcytic anemia),and liver problems.
Noonan syndrome-like disorder with loose anagen hair 1
MedGen UID:
1379805
Concept ID:
C4478716
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome-like disorder with loose anagen hair is characterized by facial features similar to those observed in Noonan syndrome (163950), including hypertelorism, ptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures, low-set posteriorly angulated ears, and overfolded pinnae. In addition, patients display short stature, frequently with growth hormone (GH; see 139250) deficiency; cognitive deficits; relative macrocephaly; small posterior fossa resulting in Chiari I malformation; hypernasal voice; cardiac defects, especially dysplasia of the mitral valve and septal defects; and ectodermal abnormalities, in which the most characteristic feature is the hair anomaly, including easily pluckable, sparse, thin, slow-growing hair (summary by Bertola et al., 2017). Reviews Komatsuzaki et al. (2010) reviewed the clinical manifestations of patients with Noonan syndrome, Costello syndrome (218040), and cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC; see 115150) compared to patients with mutations in the SHOC2 gene. They noted that although there is phenotypic overlap among the disorders, loose anagen/easily pluckable hair had not been reported in mutation-positive patients with Noonan, CFC, or Costello syndrome, and appeared to be a distinctive feature of SHOC2 mutation-positive patients. Genetic Heterogeneity of Noonan Syndrome-Like Disorder with Loose Anagen Hair NSLH2 (617506) is caused by mutation in the PPP1CB gene (600590) on chromosome 2p23.
Bleeding disorder, platelet-type, 21
MedGen UID:
1386863
Concept ID:
C4479515
Disease or Syndrome
BDPLT21 is a hematologic disorder characterized by increased risk of bleeding resulting from a functional platelet defect. Platelets have decreased or even absent dense bodies and abnormally enlarged and fused alpha-granules, and they show defective secretion and aggregation responses to agonists. Platelets are usually enlarged, and some patients may have mild to moderate thrombocytopenia (summary by Saultier et al., 2017).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 48
MedGen UID:
1619532
Concept ID:
C4540321
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
A rare genetic multiple congenital anomalies/dysmorphic syndrome characterized by global developmental delay and moderate to severe intellectual disability, as well as variable other manifestations, such as macro- or microcephaly, epilepsy, hypotonia, behavioral problems, stereotypic movements, and facial dysmorphism (including arched eyebrows, long palpebral fissures, prominent nasal bridge, upturned nose, dysplastic ears, and broad mouth), among others. Brain imaging may show cerebellar anomalies, hypoplastic corpus callosum, enlarged ventricles, polymicrogyria, or white matter abnormalities.
Combined immunodeficiency and megaloblastic anemia with or without hyperhomocysteinemia
MedGen UID:
1615364
Concept ID:
C4540434
Disease or Syndrome
Combined immunodeficiency and megaloblastic anemia with or without hyperhomocysteinemia is an inborn error of folate metabolism due to deficiency of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-1. Manifestations may include hemolytic uremic syndrome, macrocytosis, epilepsy, hearing loss, retinopathy, mild mental retardation, lymphopenia involving all subsets, and low T-cell receptor excision circles. Folinic acid supplementation is an effective treatment (summary by Ramakrishnan et al., 2016).
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 54
MedGen UID:
1614787
Concept ID:
C4540484
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, primary, autosomal recessive, 1
MedGen UID:
1641972
Concept ID:
C4551679
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy-1 (PHOAR1) is a rare familial disorder characterized by digital clubbing, osteoarthropathy, and acroosteolysis, with variable features of pachydermia, delayed closure of the fontanels, and congenital heart disease (summary by Uppal et al., 2008; Radhakrishnan et al., 2020). Secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, or pulmonary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, is a different disorder characterized by digital clubbing secondary to acquired diseases, most commonly intrathoracic neoplasm (Uppal et al., 2008). Touraine et al. (1935) recognized pachydermoperiostosis as a familial disorder with 3 clinical presentations or forms: a complete form characterized by periostosis and pachydermia; an incomplete form with bone changes but without pachydermia; and a 'forme fruste' with pachydermia and minimal skeletal changes. Genetic Heterogeneity Autosomal recessive primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy-2-enteropathy syndrome (PHOAR2E; 614441) is caused by mutation in the SLCO2A1 gene (601460) on chromosome 3q22. Families with an autosomal dominant form of primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, in which patients may also experience gastrointestinal symptoms, have been reported (PHOAD; 167100).
Protoporphyria, erythropoietic, 1
MedGen UID:
1643471
Concept ID:
C4692546
Disease or Syndrome
Erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) is characterized by cutaneous photosensitivity (usually beginning in infancy or childhood) that results in tingling, burning, pain, and itching within 30 minutes after exposure to sun or ultraviolet light and may be accompanied by swelling and redness. Symptoms (which may seem out of proportion to the visible skin lesions) may persist for hours or days after the initial phototoxic reaction. Photosensitivity remains for life. Multiple episodes of acute photosensitivity may lead to chronic changes of sun-exposed skin (lichenification, leathery pseudovesicles, grooving around the lips) and loss of lunulae of the nails. Approximately 20%-30% of individuals with EPP have some degree of liver dysfunction, which is typically mild with slight elevations of the liver enzymes. Up to 5% may develop more advanced liver disease which may be accompanied by motor neuropathy similar to that seen in the acute porphyrias.
Combined immunodeficiency due to DOCK8 deficiency
MedGen UID:
1648410
Concept ID:
C4722305
Disease or Syndrome
Hyper-IgE syndrome-2 with recurrent infections (HIES2) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by recurrent staphylococcal infections of the skin and respiratory tract, eczema, elevated serum immunoglobulin E, and hypereosinophilia. It is distinguished from autosomal dominant HIES1 (147060) by the lack of connective tissue and skeletal involvement (Renner et al., 2004). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hyper-IgE syndrome, see 147060. See also TYK2 deficiency (611521), a clinically distinct disease entity that includes characteristic features of both autosomal recessive HIES2 and mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD; 209950) (Minegishi et al., 2006).
Bone marrow failure syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
1648485
Concept ID:
C4748257
Disease or Syndrome
BMFS4 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early-onset anemia, leukopenia, and decreased B cells, resulting in the necessity for red cell transfusion and sometimes causing an increased susceptibility to infection. Some patients may have thrombocytopenia or variable additional nonhematologic features, such as facial dysmorphism, skeletal anomalies, and mild developmental delay. Bone marrow transplantation is curative (summary by Bahrami et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of BMFS, see BMFS1 (614675).
Severe combined immunodeficiency due to CARMIL2 deficiency
MedGen UID:
1648422
Concept ID:
C4748304
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-58 is an autosomal recessive primary immunologic disorder characterized by early-onset skin lesions, including eczematous dermatitis, infectious abscesses, and warts, recurrent respiratory infections or allergies, and chronic persistent infections with candida, Molluscum contagiosum, mycobacteria, EBV, bacteria, and viruses. Some patients may have gastrointestinal involvement, including inflammatory bowel disease, EBV+ smooth muscle tumors, and esophagitis. Immunologic analysis shows defective T-cell function with decreased Treg cells and deficient CD3/CD28 costimulation responses in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. B-cell function may also be impaired (summary by Wang et al., 2016 and Alazami et al., 2018).
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Krakow type
MedGen UID:
1648323
Concept ID:
C4748455
Disease or Syndrome
Krakow-type spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia is characterized by severe skeletal dysplasia, severe immunodeficiency, and developmental delay (Csukasi et al., 2018).
Hyper-IgE recurrent infection syndrome 3, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1648483
Concept ID:
C4748969
Disease or Syndrome
Hyper-IgE syndrome-3 with recurrent infections (HIES3) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by childhood onset of atopic dermatitis, skin infections particularly with Staphylococcus aureus, recurrent sinopulmonary infections, and increased serum IgE and IgG. Patients are susceptible to bacterial and fungal infections, including chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. Immunologic workup shows impaired differentiation of CD4+ T cells into T-helper 17 cells, decreased memory B cells, and often decreased NK cells (summary by Beziat et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hyper-IgE syndrome, see HIES1 (147060).
Intrauterine growth retardation, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia congenita, genital anomalies, and immunodeficiency
MedGen UID:
1684464
Concept ID:
C5193036
Disease or Syndrome
IMAGEI is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia congenita, genital anomalies, and immunodeficiency. Patients exhibit distinctive facial features and variable immune dysfunction with evidence of lymphocyte deficiency (Logan et al., 2018). An autosomal dominant form of the disorder, without immunodeficiency (IMAGE; 614732), is caused by mutation in the CDKN1C gene (600856) on chromosome 11p15.
Galloway-Mowat syndrome 7
MedGen UID:
1679283
Concept ID:
C5193044
Disease or Syndrome
Galloway-Mowat syndrome-7 (GAMOS7) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by developmental delay, microcephaly, and early-onset nephrotic syndrome (summary by Rosti et al., 2017). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GAMOS, see GAMOS1 (251300).
Coffin-Siris syndrome 8
MedGen UID:
1679527
Concept ID:
C5193054
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is classically characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the distal phalanx or nail of the fifth and additional digits, developmental or cognitive delay of varying degree, distinctive facial features, hypotonia, hirsutism/hypertrichosis, and sparse scalp hair. Congenital anomalies can include malformations of the cardiac, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and/or central nervous systems. Other findings commonly include feeding difficulties, slow growth, ophthalmologic abnormalities, and hearing impairment.
Hyper-IgE recurrent infection syndrome 4, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1673363
Concept ID:
C5193141
Disease or Syndrome
Hyper-IgE syndrome-4B with recurrent infections (HIES4B) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by early childhood onset of recurrent infections and skeletal abnormalities, including craniosynostosis and scoliosis. Patients are mainly susceptible to bacterial infections that affect the respiratory tract, skin, and eye. Immunologic workup shows increased serum IgE, intermittent eosinophilia, and impaired IL6 (147620) and IL27 (608273) downstream signaling that affects the development and function of certain B- and T-cell populations, as well as the acute-phase response; IL11 (147681) signaling in fibroblasts is also affected (summary by Shahin et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hyper-IgE syndrome, see HIES1 (147060).
Ectodermal dysplasia 15, hypohidrotic/hair type
MedGen UID:
1680605
Concept ID:
C5193145
Disease or Syndrome
Some ectodermal dysplasias are here classified as congenital disorders characterized by abnormal development in 2 or more ectodermal structures (hair, nails, teeth, and sweat glands) without other systemic findings. Ectodermal dysplasia-15 (ECTD15) is characterized by hypotrichosis that develops in early childhood and absence of sweating except with extreme exercise. Skin is dry from birth and eczematous lesions may develop in adulthood. Other features include blepharitis and photophobia (van den Bogaard et al., 2019).
Blau syndrome
MedGen UID:
1684759
Concept ID:
C5201146
Disease or Syndrome
Blau syndrome is characterized by the triad of granulomatous arthritis, uveitis, and dermatitis. First described in 1985, it was considered to be distinct from sarcoidosis due to the early age of onset and autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Published reports of sporadic cases of children with 'early-onset sarcoidosis' (EOS) with granulomatous involvement of different organs, primarily affecting joints, eyes, and skin, were suspected to represent the same disorder because the patients' characteristics were nearly identical. Subsequently, identical NOD2 mutations were identified in patients with Blau syndrome as well as in patients diagnosed with EOS, confirming earlier suspicions that they represented the same disease (summary by Borzutzky et al., 2010). Unlike older children diagnosed with sarcoidosis, these patients have no apparent pulmonary involvement; however, the disease is progressive and may result in severe complications such as blindness and/or joint destruction (Shetty and Gedalia, 1998).
Granulomatous disease, chronic, autosomal recessive, 5
MedGen UID:
1710326
Concept ID:
C5394542
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival.
IFAP syndrome 1, with or without BRESHECK syndrome
MedGen UID:
1746744
Concept ID:
C5399971
Disease or Syndrome
The IFAP/BRESHECK syndrome is an X-linked multiple congenital anomaly disorder with variable severity. The classic triad, which defines IFAP, is ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia, and photophobia. Some patients have additional features, including mental retardation, brain anomalies, Hirschsprung disease, corneal opacifications, kidney dysplasia, cryptorchidism, cleft palate, and skeletal malformations, particularly of the vertebrae, which constitutes BRESHECK syndrome (summary by Naiki et al., 2012). Genetic Heterogeneity of IFAP Syndrome IFAP syndrome-2 (IFAP2; 619016) is caused by heterozygous mutation in the SREBF1 gene (184756) on chromosome 17p11.
Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome with immune dysregulation 2, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1723138
Concept ID:
C5436546
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant growth hormone insensitivity syndrome with immune dysregulation-2 (GHISID2) is a congenital disorder characterized by short stature due to insensitivity to growth hormone (GH1; 139250). Affected individuals usually have delayed bone age, delayed puberty, and decreased serum IGF1 (147440). Some patients may have features of mild immune dysregulation, such as eczema, increased serum IgE, asthma, or celiac disease (summary by Klammt et al., 2018).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with or without early-onset generalized epilepsy
MedGen UID:
1737097
Concept ID:
C5436914
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with or without early-onset generalized epilepsy (NEDEGE) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals have variably impaired intellectual development, speech delay, and behavioral abnormalities. About half of patients develop early-onset generalized epilepsy with different seizure types; myoclonic seizures and myoclonic-atonic epilepsy are commonly observed. The seizures may remit with age or remain refractory to treatment. Brain imaging is essentially normal and there are no significant accompanying neurologic or systemic abnormalities (summary by Mulhern et al., 2018).
Alzahrani-Kuwahara syndrome
MedGen UID:
1782127
Concept ID:
C5543274
Disease or Syndrome
Alzahrani-Kuwahara syndrome (ALKUS) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental syndrome characterized by global developmental delay with severely impaired intellectual function and poor or absent speech. Patients have poor overall growth and dysmorphic facial features. More variable findings include early-onset cataracts, hypotonia, congenital heart defects, lower limb spasticity, and hypospadias (summary by Alzahrani et al., 2020).
VISS syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794165
Concept ID:
C5561955
Disease or Syndrome
VISS syndrome is a generalized connective tissue disorder characterized by early-onset thoracic aortic aneurysm and other connective tissue findings, such as aneurysm and tortuosity of other arteries, joint hypermobility, skin laxity, and hernias, as well as craniofacial dysmorphic features, structural cardiac defects, skeletal anomalies, and motor developmental delay (Van Gucht et al., 2021). Immune dysregulation has been observed in some patients (Ziegler et al., 2021).
Immunodeficiency 85 and autoimmunity
MedGen UID:
1794186
Concept ID:
C5561976
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-85 and autoimmunity (IMD85) is an autosomal dominant immunologic disorder characterized by onset of atopic eczema and recurrent respiratory infections in the first decade of life. Affected individuals also develop autoimmune enteropathy with vomiting, diarrhea, and poor overall growth. More variable features may include autoimmune oligoarthritis, interstitial pneumonitis, and EBV viremia. Laboratory studies show hypogammaglobulinemia and abnormal T-cell function, consistent with a combined immunodeficiency (Keskitalo et al., 2019).
Trichothiodystrophy 8, nonphotosensitive
MedGen UID:
1794267
Concept ID:
C5562057
Disease or Syndrome
Nonphotosensitive trichothiodystrophy-8 (TTD8) is characterized by brittle hair and nails and scaly skin, accompanied by failure to thrive, microcephaly, and neuromotor developmental delay. Hair analysis shows low sulfur content, and skin fibroblasts demonstrate normal DNA repair efficiency after UV irradiation (Botta et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of trichothiodystrophy, see TTD1 (601675).
Agammaglobulinemia 9, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
1794269
Concept ID:
C5562059
Disease or Syndrome
Agammaglobulinemia-9 (AGM9) is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent bacterial infections associated with agammaglobulinemia and absence of circulating B cells. Additional features include failure to thrive and skin involvement. The severity is variable: more severe cases may require hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, whereas others can be treated effectively with Ig replacement therapy (summary by Anzilotti et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal agammaglobulinemia, see AGM1 (601495).
Combined immunodeficiency due to moesin deficiency
MedGen UID:
1799546
Concept ID:
C5568123
Disease or Syndrome
IMD50 is an X-linked recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by the onset of recurrent bacterial or varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections in early childhood. Laboratory studies show profound lymphopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia, poor immune response to vaccine antigens, and fluctuating neutropenia. The disorder does not affect overall patient survival (summary by Lagresle-Peyrou et al., 2016).
Combined immunodeficiency due to GINS1 deficiency
MedGen UID:
1799555
Concept ID:
C5568132
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-55 is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, natural killer (NK) cell deficiency, and chronic neutropenia. Most patients also have postnatal growth retardation. Other clinical manifestations include mild facial dysmorphism, dry or eczematous skin, and recurrent infections with both viruses and bacteria. The disorder appears to result from a defect in DNA replication causing blockade of immune cell differentiation in the bone marrow, particularly affecting NK cells (summary by Cottineau et al., 2017).
Netherton syndrome
MedGen UID:
1802991
Concept ID:
C5574950
Disease or Syndrome
Netherton syndrome (NETH) is a rare and severe autosomal recessive skin disorder characterized by congenital erythroderma, a specific hair-shaft abnormality, and atopic manifestations with high IgE levels. Generalized scaly erythroderma is apparent at or soon after birth and usually persists. Scalp hair is sparse and brittle with a characteristic 'bamboo' shape under light microscopic examination due to invagination of the distal part of the hair shaft to its proximal part. Atopic manifestations include eczema-like rashes, atopic dermatitis, pruritus, hay fever, angioedema, urticaria, high levels of IgE in the serum, and hypereosinophilia. Life-threatening complications are frequent during the neonatal period, including hypernatremic dehydration, hypothermia, extreme weight loss, bronchopneumonia, and sepsis. During childhood, failure to thrive is common as a result of malnutrition, metabolic disorders, chronic erythroderma, persistent cutaneous infections, or enteropathy (summary by Bitoun et al., 2002).
Combined immunodeficiency due to ZAP70 deficiency
MedGen UID:
1809040
Concept ID:
C5575025
Disease or Syndrome
ZAP70-related combined immunodeficiency (ZAP70-related CID) is a cell-mediated immunodeficiency caused by abnormal T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Affected children usually present in the first year of life with recurrent bacterial, viral, and opportunistic infections, diarrhea, and failure to thrive. Severe lower-respiratory infections and oral candidiasis are common. Affected children usually do not survive past their second year without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).
Immunodeficiency 104
MedGen UID:
1801019
Concept ID:
C5676890
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-104 (IMD104) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the onset of recurrent infections in early infancy. Manifestations may include oral thrush, fever, and failure to thrive. Some patients have lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly, whereas others have absence of lymph nodes and lack a thymic shadow. Laboratory studies show decreased or absent numbers of nonfunctional T cells, normal or increased levels of B cells, variable hypogammaglobulinemia, and normal NK cells. The disorder is caused by a defect in IL7 (146660) signaling due to a mutant IL7 receptor. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be curative (Roifman et al., 2000 and Giliani et al., 2005). Giliani et al. (2005) provided a detailed review of IL7R deficiency, including discussion of the IL7R gene and its function in the immune system, clinical features of the disorder, and experiences with hematopoietic stem cell transplant as treatment. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive SCID, see 601457.
Bryant-Li-Bhoj neurodevelopmental syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1811435
Concept ID:
C5676906
Disease or Syndrome
Bryant-Li-Bhoj neurodevelopmental syndrome-2 (BRYLIB2) is a highly variable phenotype characterized predominantly by moderate to severe global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development, poor or absent speech, and delayed motor milestones. Most patients have hypotonia, although some have peripheral hypertonia. Common features include variable dysmorphic facial features, oculomotor abnormalities, feeding problems, and nonspecific brain imaging abnormalities. Additional features may include hearing loss, seizures, short stature, and mild skeletal defects (summary by Bryant et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bryant-Li-Bhoj neurodevelopmental syndrome, see BRYLIB1 (619720).
Stuve-Wiedemann syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1805977
Concept ID:
C5676919
Disease or Syndrome
Stuve-Wiedemann syndrome-2 (STWS2) is an autosomal recessive lethal skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature, small chest, bowing of the long bones, and neonatal cardiopulmonary and autonomous dysfunction. Additional variable features include congenital thrombocytopenia, eczematoid dermatitis, renal anomalies, and defective acute-phase response (Chen et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Stuve-Wiedemann syndrome, see STWS1 (601559).
Immunodeficiency 96
MedGen UID:
1810465
Concept ID:
C5676930
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-96 (IMD96) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset of recurrent, usually viral, respiratory infections in infancy or early childhood. Other infections, including gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections, may also occur. Laboratory studies show hypogammaglobulinemia, lymphopenia with increased gamma/delta T cells, and erythrocyte macrocytosis. The disorder results from defective cellular DNA repair (summary by Maffucci et al., 2018).
Immunodeficiency 97 with autoinflammation
MedGen UID:
1802936
Concept ID:
C5676946
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-97 with autoinflammation (IMD97) is an autosomal recessive complex immunologic disorder with variable features. Affected individuals present in the first decade of life with inflammatory interstitial lung disease or colitis due to abnormal tissue infiltration by activated T cells. Patients develop autoimmune cytopenias and may have lymphadenopathy; 1 reported patient had features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH; see FHL1, 267700). Some patients may have recurrent infections associated with mild lymphopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia, and NK cell dysfunction. Immunologic workup indicates signs of significant immune dysregulation with elevation of inflammatory serum markers, variable immune cell defects involving neutrophils, NK cells, and myeloid cells, and disrupted levels of T regulatory cells (Tregs). Two unrelated patients have been reported (summary by Takeda et al., 2019 and Thian et al., 2020).
Liver disease, severe congenital
MedGen UID:
1823968
Concept ID:
C5774195
Disease or Syndrome
Severe congenital liver disease (SCOLIV) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the onset of progressive hepatic dysfunction usually in the first years of life. Affected individuals show feeding difficulties with failure to thrive and features such as jaundice, hepatomegaly, and abdominal distension. Laboratory workup is consistent with hepatic insufficiency and may also show coagulation defects, anemia, or metabolic disturbances. Cirrhosis and hypernodularity are commonly observed on liver biopsy. Many patients die of liver failure in early childhood (Moreno Traspas et al., 2022).
Intellectual developmental disorder with muscle tone abnormalities and distal skeletal defects
MedGen UID:
1823972
Concept ID:
C5774199
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder with muscle tone abnormalities and distal skeletal defects (IDDMDS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay apparent in infancy manifest as speech delay and late walking by a few years. Affected individuals have hypertonia or, more rarely, hypotonia; a notable common feature is facial myokymia with corresponding EMG findings. Additional features include distal skeletal defects such as joint contractures, hypo- or areflexia, and hernia (Marafi et al., 2022).
Atelis syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1824054
Concept ID:
C5774281
Disease or Syndrome
Atelis syndrome-1 (ATELS1) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with learning difficulties and poor overall growth with short stature and microcephaly. Most patients have anemia, some have immunologic defects, and some have congenital heart septal defects. More variable features may include hypotonia, dysmorphic facial features, skin pigmentary anomalies, and mild skeletal defects. Patient cells show multiple chromosomal abnormalities due to impaired DNA replication and disrupted mitosis (Grange et al., 2022). See also ATELS2 (620185), caused by mutation in the SMC5 gene (609386) on chromosome 9q21. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of MVA, see MVA1 (257300).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, dysmorphic facies, and skin abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1824058
Concept ID:
C5774285
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, dysmorphic facies, and skin abnormalities (NEDHFS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and poor or absent speech. Affected individuals have dysmorphic facies, including large abnormally shaped ears and strabismus, hypotonia, and dry skin with keratosis pilaris. Some patients develop seizures. Metabolic studies are unremarkable (Morava et al., 2021).
Intellectual developmental disorder, autosomal dominant 71, with behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1841073
Concept ID:
C5830437
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Autosomal dominant intellectual developmental disorder-71 with behavioral abnormalities (MRD71) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with hypotonia, speech delay, and variably impaired cognitive development. Almost all affected individuals show marked behavioral manifestations, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), ADHD, hypersensitivity, and aggression. Many have dysmorphic features, although there is not a common gestalt (Harris et al., 2021).
Hatipoglu immunodeficiency syndrome
MedGen UID:
1841075
Concept ID:
C5830439
Disease or Syndrome
Hatipoglu immunodeficiency syndrome (HATIS) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by childhood onset of failure to thrive, skin manifestations, pancytopenia, and susceptibility to recurrent infections (Harapas et al., 2022).
Intellectual developmental disorder, autosomal recessive 79
MedGen UID:
1841189
Concept ID:
C5830553
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive intellectual developmental disorder-79 (MRT79) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy. Affected individuals have mildly delayed walking with an ataxic gait and severely impaired intellectual development with poor or absent speech. Additional features may include postnatal microcephaly and dysmorphic features (Van Bergen et al., 2022).
Immunodeficiency 113 with autoimmunity and autoinflammation
MedGen UID:
1851770
Concept ID:
C5882711
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-113 with autoimmunity and autoinflammation (IMD113) is an autosomal recessive complex immunologic disorder with onset of symptoms in infancy. Affected individuals have recurrent infections and usually show features of autoimmunity and autoinflammation, such as hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, leukocytosis, neutrophilia, and elevated acute phase reactants. More variable systemic features may include celiac disease or enteropathy, ileus, nephropathy, eczema, and dermatomyositis. Additional features include facial dysmorphism, scoliosis, and poor wound healing. One patient with neurodevelopmental abnormalities has been reported. The disorder results from dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton that affects certain cell lineages (Nunes-Santos et al., 2023).
Immunodeficiency 115 with autoinflammation
MedGen UID:
1847791
Concept ID:
C5882724
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-115 with autoinflammation (IMD115) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the onset of symptoms of immune dysregulation in early infancy. Affected individuals have immunodeficiency with recurrent bacterial, viral, and fungal infections, as well as autoinflammatory features, including arthritis and dermatitis. Some patients may have more systemic involvement, such as myopathy, gastrointestinal abnormalities, and anemia. Laboratory studies show variable B-cell and T-cell defects, sometimes with defective antibody responses and hypogammaglobulinemia (Boisson et al., 2015; Oda et al., 2019).
Tan-Almurshedi syndrome
MedGen UID:
1848300
Concept ID:
C5882727
Disease or Syndrome
Tan-Almurshedi syndrome (TANALS) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, poor overall growth with short stature and microcephaly, hypotonia, global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development, poor or absent speech, spasticity, and dysmorphic facial features (Westrip et al., 2023).
Hyper-IgE recurrent infection syndrome 1, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1846538
Concept ID:
CN031130
Disease or Syndrome
STAT3 hyper IgE syndrome (STAT3-HIES) is a primary immune deficiency syndrome characterized by elevated serum IgE, eczema, and recurrent skin and respiratory tract infections, together with several nonimmune features. This disorder typically manifests in the newborn period with a rash (often diagnosed as eosinophilic pustulosis) that subsequently evolves into an eczematoid dermatitis. Recurrent staphylococcal skin boils and bacterial pneumonias usually manifest in the first years of life. Pneumatoceles and bronchiectasis often result from aberrant healing of pneumonias. Mucocutaneous candidiasis is common. Nonimmune features may include retained primary teeth, scoliosis, bone fractures following minimal trauma, joint hyperextensibility, and characteristic facial appearance, which typically emerges in adolescence. Vascular abnormalities have been described and include middle-sized artery tortuosity and aneurysms, with infrequent clinical sequelae of myocardial infarction and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal dysmotility, and spontaneous intestinal perforations (some of which are associated with diverticuli). Fungal infections of the GI tract (typically histoplasmosis, Cryptococcus, and Coccidioides) also occur infrequently. Survival is typically into adulthood, with most individuals now living into or past the sixth decade. Most deaths are associated with gram-negative (Pseudomonas) or filamentous fungal pneumonias resulting in hemoptysis. Lymphomas occur at an increased frequency.

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Yamany T, Schwartz RA
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2015 Feb;29(2):203-208. Epub 2014 Sep 11 doi: 10.1111/jdv.12715. PMID: 25209074
Karaman O, Uguz A, Uzuner N
Pediatr Int 1999 Apr;41(2):147-50. doi: 10.1046/j.1442-200x.1999.4121046.x. PMID: 10221017
Loechelt BJ, Shapiro RS, Jyonouchi H, Filipovich AH
Bone Marrow Transplant 1995 Sep;16(3):381-5. PMID: 8535310
Singh G, Bhattacharya K
Indian J Dermatol 1989 Jun;34(2):25-31. PMID: 2632374
Yung CY
Pharmacol Biochem Behav 1984;21 Suppl 1:51-5. doi: 10.1016/0091-3057(84)90163-1. PMID: 6395135

Diagnosis

Navarro-Triviño FJ, Ruiz-Villaverde R
Dermatol Ther 2020 Nov;33(6):e14471. Epub 2020 Nov 4 doi: 10.1111/dth.14471. PMID: 33112026
Yim JH, Jeong KH, Shin MK
Skin Res Technol 2017 May;23(2):169-175. Epub 2016 Aug 11 doi: 10.1111/srt.12315. PMID: 27511797
Yamany T, Schwartz RA
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2015 Feb;29(2):203-208. Epub 2014 Sep 11 doi: 10.1111/jdv.12715. PMID: 25209074
Marinović-Kulisić S, Lipozencić J, Ljubojević S, Milavec-Puretić V
Acta Dermatovenerol Croat 2004;12(4):261-7. PMID: 15588559
Misago N, Tanaka T, Takeuchi M, Oka S
J Dermatol 1995 Sep;22(9):673-6. doi: 10.1111/j.1346-8138.1995.tb03896.x. PMID: 8537554

Therapy

Navarro-Triviño FJ, Ruiz-Villaverde R
Dermatol Ther 2020 Nov;33(6):e14471. Epub 2020 Nov 4 doi: 10.1111/dth.14471. PMID: 33112026
Karaman O, Uguz A, Uzuner N
Pediatr Int 1999 Apr;41(2):147-50. doi: 10.1046/j.1442-200x.1999.4121046.x. PMID: 10221017
Chen W, Wong WK, Chen TC
J Formos Med Assoc 1990 May;89(5):388-91. PMID: 1977850
Yung CY
Pharmacol Biochem Behav 1984;21 Suppl 1:51-5. doi: 10.1016/0091-3057(84)90163-1. PMID: 6395135
Gubner R
Arch Dermatol 1983 Jun;119(6):513-24. PMID: 6859892

Prognosis

Yamany T, Schwartz RA
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2015 Feb;29(2):203-208. Epub 2014 Sep 11 doi: 10.1111/jdv.12715. PMID: 25209074
Balci YI, Turul T, Daar G, Anak S, Devecioglu O, Tezcan I, Cetinkaya DU
Pediatr Transplant 2008 Aug;12(5):597-9. Epub 2008 Mar 10 doi: 10.1111/j.1399-3046.2008.00908.x. PMID: 18331539
Karaman O, Uguz A, Uzuner N
Pediatr Int 1999 Apr;41(2):147-50. doi: 10.1046/j.1442-200x.1999.4121046.x. PMID: 10221017
Leung DY, Geha RS
Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 1988 Mar;2(1):81-100. PMID: 3279022
Gubner R
Arch Dermatol 1983 Jun;119(6):513-24. PMID: 6859892

Clinical prediction guides

Navarro-Triviño FJ, Ruiz-Villaverde R
Dermatol Ther 2020 Nov;33(6):e14471. Epub 2020 Nov 4 doi: 10.1111/dth.14471. PMID: 33112026
Brailol V, Juras DV, Stanimirović A, Boras VV, Gabrić D, Vrdoljak DV
Acta Clin Croat 2015 Mar;54(1):77-82. PMID: 26058247
Yamany T, Schwartz RA
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2015 Feb;29(2):203-208. Epub 2014 Sep 11 doi: 10.1111/jdv.12715. PMID: 25209074
Loechelt BJ, Shapiro RS, Jyonouchi H, Filipovich AH
Bone Marrow Transplant 1995 Sep;16(3):381-5. PMID: 8535310
Gubner R
Arch Dermatol 1983 Jun;119(6):513-24. PMID: 6859892

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      See practice and clinical guidelines in NCBI Bookshelf. The search results may include broader topics and may not capture all published guidelines. See the FAQ for details.

    Curated

    • NICE, 2021
      UK NICE Guideline NG190, Secondary bacterial infection of eczema and other common skin conditions: antimicrobial prescribing, 2021

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