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Hemolytic anemia

MedGen UID:
1916
Concept ID:
C0002878
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Anaemia, Haemolytic; Anemia, Hemolytic; Haemolytic Anaemia; Haemolytic Anaemias; Hemolytic Anemia
SNOMED CT: Hemolytic anemia (61261009)
 
HPO: HP:0001878
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0003664

Definition

A type of anemia caused by premature destruction of red blood cells (hemolysis). [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVHemolytic anemia

Conditions with this feature

Hb SS disease
MedGen UID:
287
Concept ID:
C0002895
Disease or Syndrome
Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by intermittent vaso-occlusive events and chronic hemolytic anemia. Vaso-occlusive events result in tissue ischemia leading to acute and chronic pain as well as organ damage that can affect any organ system, including the bones, spleen, liver, brain, lungs, kidneys, and joints. Dactylitis (pain and/or swelling of the hands or feet) is often the earliest manifestation of SCD. In children, the spleen can become engorged with blood cells in a "splenic sequestration." The spleen is particularly vulnerable to infarction and the majority of individuals with SCD who are not on hydroxyurea or transfusion therapy become functionally asplenic in early childhood, increasing their risk for certain types of bacterial infections, primarily encapsulated organisms. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a major cause of mortality in SCD. Chronic hemolysis can result in varying degrees of anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis, and delayed growth and sexual maturation as well as activating pathways that contribute to the pathophysiology directly. Individuals with the highest rates of hemolysis are at higher risk for pulmonary artery hypertension, priapism, and leg ulcers and may be relatively protected from vaso-occlusive pain.
Glycogen storage disease, type VII
MedGen UID:
5342
Concept ID:
C0017926
Disease or Syndrome
Glycogen storage disease VII is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized clinically by exercise intolerance, muscle cramping, exertional myopathy, and compensated hemolysis. Myoglobinuria may also occur. The deficiency of the muscle isoform of PFK results in a total and partial loss of muscle and red cell PFK activity, respectively. Raben and Sherman (1995) noted that not all patients with GSD VII seek medical care because in some cases it is a relatively mild disorder.
Wilson disease
MedGen UID:
42426
Concept ID:
C0019202
Disease or Syndrome
Wilson disease is a disorder of copper metabolism that can present with hepatic, neurologic, or psychiatric disturbances, or a combination of these, in individuals ranging from age three years to older than 50 years; symptoms vary among and within families. Liver disease includes recurrent jaundice, simple acute self-limited hepatitis-like illness, autoimmune-type hepatitis, fulminant hepatic failure, or chronic liver disease. Neurologic presentations include movement disorders (tremors, poor coordination, loss of fine-motor control, chorea, choreoathetosis) or rigid dystonia (mask-like facies, rigidity, gait disturbance, pseudobulbar involvement). Psychiatric disturbance includes depression, neurotic behaviors, disorganization of personality, and, occasionally, intellectual deterioration. Kayser-Fleischer rings, frequently present, result from copper deposition in Descemet's membrane of the cornea and reflect a high degree of copper storage in the body.
Norum disease
MedGen UID:
9698
Concept ID:
C0023195
Disease or Syndrome
Complete LCAT deficiency is a disorder that primarily affects the eyes and kidneys.\n\nIn complete LCAT deficiency, the clear front surface of the eyes (the corneas) gradually becomes cloudy. The cloudiness, which generally first appears in early childhood, consists of small grayish dots of cholesterol (opacities) distributed across the corneas. Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that is produced in the body and obtained from foods that come from animals; it aids in many functions of the body but can become harmful in excessive amounts. As complete LCAT deficiency progresses, the corneal cloudiness worsens and can lead to severely impaired vision.\n\nPeople with complete LCAT deficiency often have kidney disease that begins in adolescence or early adulthood. The kidney problems get worse over time and may eventually lead to kidney failure. Individuals with this disorder also usually have a condition known as hemolytic anemia, in which red blood cells are broken down (undergo hemolysis) prematurely, resulting in a shortage of red blood cells (anemia). Anemia can cause pale skin, weakness, fatigue, and more serious complications.\n\nOther features of complete LCAT deficiency that occur in some affected individuals include enlargement of the liver (hepatomegaly), spleen (splenomegaly), or lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy) or an accumulation of fatty deposits on the artery walls (atherosclerosis).
Systemic lupus erythematosus
MedGen UID:
6146
Concept ID:
C0024141
Disease or Syndrome
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by production of autoantibodies against nuclear, cytoplasmic, and cell surface molecules that transcend organ-specific boundaries. Tissue deposition of antibodies or immune complexes induces inflammation and subsequent injury of multiple organs and finally results in clinical manifestations of SLE, including glomerulonephritis, dermatitis, thrombosis, vasculitis, seizures, and arthritis. Evidence strongly suggests the involvement of genetic components in SLE susceptibility (summary by Oishi et al., 2008). Genetic Heterogeneity of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus An autosomal recessive form of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLEB16; 614420) is caused by mutation in the DNASE1L3 gene (602244) on chromosome 3p14.3. An X-linked dominant form of SLE (SLEB17; 301080) is caused by heterozygous mutation in the TLR7 gene (300365) on chromosome Xp22. See MAPPING and MOLECULAR GENETICS sections for a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of susceptibility to SLE.
Cutaneous porphyria
MedGen UID:
102408
Concept ID:
C0162530
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is characterized in most individuals by severe cutaneous photosensitivity with blistering and increased friability of the skin over light-exposed areas. Onset in most affected individuals occurs at birth or early infancy. The first manifestation is often pink-to-dark red discoloration of the urine. Hemolytic anemia is common and can range from mild to severe, with some affected individuals requiring chronic blood transfusions. Porphyrin deposition may lead to corneal ulcers and scarring, reddish-brown discoloration of the teeth (erythrodontia), and bone loss and/or expansion of the bone marrow. The phenotypic spectrum, however, is broad and ranges from nonimmune hydrops fetalis in utero to late-onset disease with only mild cutaneous manifestations in adulthood.
Deficiency of UDPglucose-hexose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase
MedGen UID:
82777
Concept ID:
C0268151
Disease or Syndrome
The term "galactosemia" refers to disorders of galactose metabolism that include classic galactosemia, clinical variant galactosemia, and biochemical variant galactosemia (not covered in this chapter). This GeneReview focuses on: Classic galactosemia, which can result in life-threatening complications including feeding problems, failure to thrive, hepatocellular damage, bleeding, and E coli sepsis in untreated infants. If a lactose-restricted diet is provided during the first ten days of life, the neonatal signs usually quickly resolve and the complications of liver failure, sepsis, and neonatal death are prevented; however, despite adequate treatment from an early age, children with classic galactosemia remain at increased risk for developmental delays, speech problems (termed childhood apraxia of speech and dysarthria), and abnormalities of motor function. Almost all females with classic galactosemia manifest hypergonadatropic hypogonadism or premature ovarian insufficiency (POI). Clinical variant galactosemia, which can result in life-threatening complications including feeding problems, failure to thrive, hepatocellular damage including cirrhosis, and bleeding in untreated infants. This is exemplified by the disease that occurs in African Americans and native Africans in South Africa. Persons with clinical variant galactosemia may be missed with newborn screening as the hypergalactosemia is not as marked as in classic galactosemia and breath testing is normal. If a lactose-restricted diet is provided during the first ten days of life, the severe acute neonatal complications are usually prevented. African Americans with clinical variant galactosemia and adequate early treatment do not appear to be at risk for long-term complications, including POI.
Porphobilinogen synthase deficiency
MedGen UID:
78659
Concept ID:
C0268328
Disease or Syndrome
ALAD porphyria is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that has been reported and confirmed by genetic analysis in only 5 patients (Jaffe and Stith, 2007).
Harderoporphyria
MedGen UID:
137981
Concept ID:
C0342859
Disease or Syndrome
Harderoporphyria (HARPO) is a rare erythropoietic variant form of hereditary coproporphyria (HCP; 121300) characterized by neonatal hemolytic anemia, sometimes accompanied by skin lesions, and massive excretion of harderoporphyrin in feces. During childhood and adulthood, a mild residual anemia is chronically observed (review by Schmitt et al., 2005).
Hyper-IgM syndrome type 1
MedGen UID:
96019
Concept ID:
C0398689
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked hyper IgM syndrome (HIGM1), a disorder of abnormal T- and B-cell function, is characterized by low serum concentrations of IgG, IgA, and IgE with normal or elevated serum concentrations of IgM. Mitogen proliferation may be normal, but NK- and T-cell cytotoxicity can be impaired. Antigen-specific responses are usually decreased or absent. Total numbers of B cells are normal but there is a marked reduction of class-switched memory B cells. Defective oxidative burst of both neutrophils and macrophages has been reported. The range of clinical findings varies, even within the same family. More than 50% of males with HIGM1 develop symptoms by age one year, and more than 90% are symptomatic by age four years. HIGM1 usually presents in infancy with recurrent upper- and lower-respiratory tract bacterial infections, opportunistic infections including Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, and recurrent or protracted diarrhea that can be infectious or noninfectious and is associated with failure to thrive. Neutropenia is common; thrombocytopenia and anemia are less commonly seen. Autoimmune and/or inflammatory disorders (such as sclerosing cholangitis) as well as increased risk for neoplasms have been reported as medical complications of this disorder. Significant neurologic complications, often the result of a CNS infection, are seen in 5%-15% of affected males. Liver disease, a serious complication of HIGM1 once observed in more than 80% of affected males by age 20 years, may be decreasing with adequate screening and treatment of Cryptosporidium infection.
Glutathione synthetase deficiency with 5-oxoprolinuria
MedGen UID:
97988
Concept ID:
C0398746
Disease or Syndrome
Glutathione synthetase deficiency, or 5-oxoprolinuria, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized, in its severe form, by massive urinary excretion of 5-oxoproline, metabolic acidosis, hemolytic anemia, and central nervous system damage. The metabolic defect results in decreased levels of cellular glutathione, which overstimulates the synthesis of gamma-glutamylcysteine and its subsequent conversion to 5-oxoproline (Larsson and Anderson, 2001).
Pyropoikilocytosis, hereditary
MedGen UID:
141708
Concept ID:
C0520739
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary pyropoikilocytosis was originally described by Zarkowsky et al. (1975) as a distinct hemolytic anemia characterized by microspherocytosis, poikilocytosis, and an unusual thermal sensitivity of red cells. HPP is a subset of hereditary elliptocytosis (see 611804) due to homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in spectrin leading to severe disruption of spectrin self-association (review by An and Mohandas, 2008).
Kabuki syndrome
MedGen UID:
162897
Concept ID:
C0796004
Congenital Abnormality
Kabuki syndrome (KS) is characterized by typical facial features (long palpebral fissures with eversion of the lateral third of the lower eyelid; arched and broad eyebrows; short columella with depressed nasal tip; large, prominent, or cupped ears), minor skeletal anomalies, persistence of fetal fingertip pads, mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, and postnatal growth deficiency. Other findings may include: congenital heart defects, genitourinary anomalies, cleft lip and/or palate, gastrointestinal anomalies including anal atresia, ptosis and strabismus, and widely spaced teeth and hypodontia. Functional differences can include: increased susceptibility to infections and autoimmune disorders, seizures, endocrinologic abnormalities (including isolated premature thelarche in females), feeding problems, and hearing loss.
Ovalocytosis, hereditary hemolytic, with defective erythropoiesis
MedGen UID:
322255
Concept ID:
C1833689
Disease or Syndrome
Familial pseudohyperkalemia
MedGen UID:
324588
Concept ID:
C1836705
Disease or Syndrome
'Familial pseudohyperkalemia' (PSHK) is a term that was coined to describe conditions in which a patient presents with pseudohyperkalemia as a result of a temperature-based abnormality in the transport of potassium (K) and sodium (Na) across the red cell membrane, in association with essentially normal hematology. PSHK can be considered to be the clinically benign, nonhemolytic cousin of hereditary stomatocytic leaky-cell, congenital hemolytic anemias (see 194380) (summary by Gore et al., 2002). For a discussion of clinical and genetic heterogeneity of the hereditary stomatocytoses, see 194380.
Hereditary cryohydrocytosis with reduced stomatin
MedGen UID:
332390
Concept ID:
C1837206
Disease or Syndrome
Stomatin-deficient cryohydrocytosis with neurologic defects is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, seizures, cataracts, and pseudohyperkalemia resulting from defects in the red blood cell membrane. The disorder combines the neurologic features of Glut1 deficiency syndrome-1 (GLUT1DS1; 606777), resulting from impaired glucose transport at the blood-brain barrier, and hemolytic anemia/pseudohyperkalemia with stomatocytosis, resulting from a cation leak in erythrocytes (summary by Bawazir et al., 2012). For a discussion of clinical and genetic heterogeneity of red cell stomatocyte disorders, see 194380.
Beta-thalassemia-X-linked thrombocytopenia syndrome
MedGen UID:
326415
Concept ID:
C1839161
Disease or Syndrome
GATA1-related cytopenia is characterized by thrombocytopenia and/or anemia ranging from mild to severe. One or more of the following may also be present: platelet dysfunction, mild ß-thalassemia, neutropenia, and congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) in males. Thrombocytopenia typically presents in infancy as a bleeding disorder with easy bruising and mucosal bleeding (e.g., epistaxis). Anemia ranges from minimal (mild dyserythropoiesis) to severe (hydrops fetalis requiring in utero transfusion). At the extreme end of the clinical spectrum, severe hemorrhage and/or erythrocyte transfusion dependence are life long; at the milder end, anemia and the risk for bleeding may decrease spontaneously with age. Heterozygous females may have mild-to-moderate symptoms such as menorrhagia.
Heme oxygenase 1 deficiency
MedGen UID:
333882
Concept ID:
C1841651
Disease or Syndrome
Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency (HMOX1D) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with a complex clinical presentation including direct antibody negative hemolytic anemia, low bilirubin, and hyperinflammation (summary by Chau et al., 2020). Other features may include asplenia and nephritis (Radhakrishnan et al., 2011).
Childhood onset GLUT1 deficiency syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
330866
Concept ID:
C1842534
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1 DS) is now known to be a continuum that includes the classic phenotype as well as paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia and epilepsy (previously known as dystonia 18 [DYT18]) and paroxysmal choreoathetosis with spasticity (previously known as dystonia 9 [DYT9]), atypical childhood absence epilepsy, myoclonic astatic epilepsy, and paroxysmal non-epileptic findings including intermittent ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, and alternating hemiplegia. The classic phenotype is characterized by infantile-onset seizures, delayed neurologic development, acquired microcephaly, and complex movement disorders. Seizures in classic early-onset Glut1 DS begin before age six months. Several seizure types occur: generalized tonic or clonic, focal, myoclonic, atypical absence, atonic, and unclassified. In some infants, apneic episodes and abnormal episodic eye-head movements similar to opsoclonus may precede the onset of seizures. The frequency, severity, and type of seizures vary among affected individuals and are not related to disease severity. Cognitive impairment, ranging from learning disabilities to severe intellectual disability, is typical. The complex movement disorder, characterized by ataxia, dystonia, and chorea, may occur in any combination and may be continuous, paroxysmal, or continual with fluctuations in severity influenced by environmental factors such as fasting or with infectious stress. Symptoms often improve substantially when a ketogenic diet is started.
Rh-null, regulator type
MedGen UID:
340309
Concept ID:
C1849387
Disease or Syndrome
The RH-null phenotype designates rare individuals whose red blood cells lack all Rh antigens. Two RH-null types, the regulator type (RHNR) and the amorph type (RHNA; 617970), arising from independent genetic mechanisms have been distinguished. The regulator type is caused by mutation in the RHAG gene (180297), which encodes the Rh50 glycoprotein that is crucial for the surface disposition of Rh antigens. The amorph type arises from mutations at the RH locus itself that silence Rh expression. The RH locus contains the RHD (111680) and RHCE (111700) genes tandemly arranged at chromosome 1p36-p34. Four genes must therefore be silenced to produce the RH-null phenotype. The absence of the D antigen, produced by the RHD gene, is common in the human population; the D-negative phenotype may result from deletion or genetic alteration of the RHD gene. The absence of D antigen defines the Rh-negative status of the human erythrocyte (summary by Huang et al., 2000). Whereas Rh-null cells lack all Rh antigens, Rh-mod cells display a markedly reduced antigen expression. Clinically, Rh-deficient individuals exhibit a mild to moderate chronic hemolytic anemia accompanied by a varying degree of spherostomatocytosis (summary by Huang et al., 1999).
Hemolytic anemia due to pyrimidine 5' nucleotidase deficiency
MedGen UID:
341470
Concept ID:
C1849507
Disease or Syndrome
Deficiency of pyrimidine 5-prime nucleotidase, also called uridine 5-prime monophosphate hydrolase, causes an autosomal recessive hemolytic anemia characterized by marked basophilic stippling and the accumulation of high concentrations of pyrimidine nucleotides within the erythrocyte. The enzyme is implicated in the anemia of lead poisoning and is possibly associated with learning difficulties. Hirono et al. (1988) suggested that this deficiency is the third most common RBC enzymopathy--after G6PD (300908) and pyruvate kinase (see 266200) deficiencies--causing hemolysis (summary by Marinaki et al., 2001).
Elliptocytosis 2
MedGen UID:
343643
Concept ID:
C1851741
Disease or Syndrome
Any hereditary elliptocytosis in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the SPTA1 gene.
Immunodeficiency due to CD25 deficiency
MedGen UID:
377894
Concept ID:
C1853392
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-41 is an autosomal recessive complex disorder of immune dysregulation. Affected individuals present in infancy with recurrent viral, fungal, and bacterial infections, lymphadenopathy, and variable autoimmune features, such as autoimmune enteropathy and eczematous skin lesions. Immunologic studies show a defect in T-cell regulation (summary by Goudy et al., 2013).
Glutathione synthetase deficiency without 5-oxoprolinuria
MedGen UID:
343541
Concept ID:
C1856399
Disease or Syndrome
Two forms of glutathione synthetase deficiency have been described; a mild form, referred to as glutathione synthetase deficiency of erythrocytes, causing hemolytic anemia, and a more severe form causing 5-oxoprolinuria with secondary neurologic involvement (266130).
Gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase deficiency
MedGen UID:
347272
Concept ID:
C1856603
Disease or Syndrome
Gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase deficiency is 1 of 4 diseases involving enzymes in the gamma-glutamyl cycle (Meister, 1974). The other 3 disorders are glutathione synthetase deficiency (231900), 5-oxoprolinuria, which is a severe or generalized form of glutathione synthetase deficiency (266130), and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase deficiency (231950). All except gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase deficiency are accompanied by hemolytic anemia (Larsson and Anderson, 2001).
ACETOPHENETIDIN SENSITIVITY
MedGen UID:
395437
Concept ID:
C1860214
Finding
Triosephosphate isomerase deficiency
MedGen UID:
349893
Concept ID:
C1860808
Disease or Syndrome
Triosephosphate isomerase deficiency (TPID) is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by congenital hemolytic anemia, and progressive neuromuscular dysfunction beginning in early childhood. Many patients die from respiratory failure in childhood. The neurologic syndrome is variable, but usually includes lower motor neuron dysfunction with hypotonia, muscle weakness and atrophy, and hyporeflexia. Some patients may show additional signs such as dystonic posturing and/or spasticity. Laboratory studies show intracellular accumulation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), particularly in red blood cells (summary by Fermo et al., 2010).
Cryohydrocytosis
MedGen UID:
396137
Concept ID:
C1861453
Disease or Syndrome
Cryohydrocytosis (CHC) is an exceedingly rare condition characterized by a mild stomatocytic hemolytic state with hyperbilirubinemia. A hallmark of this condition is that red blood cells (RBCs) lyse on storage at 4 degrees centigrade. RBC cation permeability is increased at 37 degrees centigrade, and the cells also accumulate sodium in the cold (summary by Coles et al., 1999). Patients present with fatigue, mild anemia, and pseudohyperkalemia due to a potassium leak from the RBCs (summary by Bogdanova et al., 2010). For a discussion of clinical and genetic heterogeneity of the hereditary stomatocytoses, see 194380.
Overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis
MedGen UID:
348876
Concept ID:
C1861455
Disease or Syndrome
Overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis is a variably compensated macrocytic hemolytic anemia of fluctuating severity, characterized by circulating erythrocytes with slit-like lucencies (stomata) evident on peripheral blood smears. OHST red cells exhibit cation leak, resulting in elevated cell Na+ content with reduced K+ content, with increased ouabain-resistant cation leak fluxes in the presence of presumably compensatory increases in ouabain-sensitive Na(+)-K(+) ATPase activity, and red cell age-dependent loss of stomatin/EBP7.2 (EBP72; 133090) from the erythroid membrane. Clinically, patients with OHST exhibit overhydrated erythrocytes and a temperature-dependent red cell cation leak. The temperature dependence of the leak is 'monotonic' and has a steep slope, reflecting the very large leak at 37 degrees centigrade (summary by Bruce, 2009 and Stewart et al., 2011). For a discussion of clinical and genetic heterogeneity of the hereditary stomatocytoses, see 194380.
Southeast Asian ovalocytosis
MedGen UID:
350649
Concept ID:
C1862322
Disease or Syndrome
Southeast Asian ovalocytosis is a hereditary red blood cell disorder that is widespread in certain ethnic groups of Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, and Indonesia. Ovalocytic erythrocytes are rigid and exhibit reduced expression of many erythrocyte antigens. The ovalocytes are resistant to invasion in vitro by several strains of malaria, including Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium knowlesi (summary by Jarolim et al., 1991). The disorder is most often asymptomatic but has been reported to be associated with signs of mild hemolysis such as intermittent jaundice and gallstones (summary by Reardon et al., 1993).
Hemolytic anemia due to erythrocyte adenosine deaminase overproduction
MedGen UID:
400240
Concept ID:
C1863235
Disease or Syndrome
Hemolytic anemia due to elevated adenosine deaminase (HAEADA) is an X-linked hematologic disorder characterized by onset of mild to moderate red cell anemia soon after birth or in childhood. The anemia is associated with significantly increased activity of ADA (608958) specifically in erythrocyte precursors. ATP levels may be secondarily decreased. Additional features may include low birth weight, thrombocytopenia, hypospadias, and splenomegaly. Males are preferentially affected, although carrier females may show elevated erythrocyte ADA or mild features (Ludwig et al., 2022).
6-phosphogluconolactonase deficiency
MedGen UID:
358188
Concept ID:
C1868355
Disease or Syndrome
Glycogen storage disease due to phosphoglycerate kinase 1 deficiency
MedGen UID:
410166
Concept ID:
C1970848
Disease or Syndrome
Phosphoglycerate kinase-1 deficiency is an X-linked recessive condition with a highly variable clinical phenotype that includes hemolytic anemia, myopathy, and neurologic involvement. Patients can express 1, 2, or all 3 of these manifestations (Shirakawa et al., 2006).
Hereditary spherocytosis type 1
MedGen UID:
382302
Concept ID:
C2674218
Disease or Syndrome
Any hereditary spherocytosis in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ANK1 gene.
Hereditary spherocytosis type 2
MedGen UID:
436112
Concept ID:
C2674219
Disease or Syndrome
People with the mild form may have very mild anemia or sometimes have no symptoms. People with the moderate form typically have anemia, jaundice, and splenomegaly. Many also develop gallstones. The signs and symptoms of moderate hereditary spherocytosis usually appear in childhood. Individuals with the moderate/severe form have all the features of the moderate form but also have severe anemia. Those with the severe form have life-threatening anemia that requires frequent blood transfusions to replenish their red blood cell supply. They also have severe splenomegaly, jaundice, and a high risk for developing gallstones. Some individuals with the severe form have short stature, delayed sexual development, and skeletal abnormalities.\n\nThere are four forms of hereditary spherocytosis, which are distinguished by the severity of signs and symptoms. They are known as the mild form, the moderate form, the moderate/severe form, and the severe form. It is estimated that 20 to 30 percent of people with hereditary spherocytosis have the mild form, 60 to 70 percent have the moderate form, 10 percent have the moderate/severe form, and 3 to 5 percent have the severe form.\n\nHereditary spherocytosis is a condition that affects red blood cells. People with this condition typically experience a shortage of red blood cells (anemia), yellowing of the eyes and skin (jaundice), and an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly). Most newborns with hereditary spherocytosis have severe anemia, although it improves after the first year of life. Splenomegaly can occur anytime from early childhood to adulthood. About half of affected individuals develop hard deposits in the gallbladder called gallstones, which typically occur from late childhood to mid-adulthood.
Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome type 4
MedGen UID:
382434
Concept ID:
C2674723
Disease or Syndrome
RAS-associated leukoproliferative disorder is characterized by lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and variable autoimmune phenomena, including autoimmune hemolytic anemia, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and neutropenia. Laboratory studies show an expansion of lymphocytes due to defective apoptosis, as well as significant autoantibodies. Some patients have recurrent infections, and there may be an increased risk of hematologic malignancy (summary by Oliveira, 2013 and Niemela et al., 2010). The disorder shows significant overlap with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS; 601859) and was originally designated ALPS IV.
Hereditary spherocytosis type 5
MedGen UID:
436371
Concept ID:
C2675192
Disease or Syndrome
EPB42-related hereditary spherocytosis (EPB42-HS) is a chronic nonimmune hemolytic anemia that is usually of mild-to-moderate severity. EPB42-HS can present with jaundice as early as the first 24 hours of life or can present later in childhood with anemia resulting from a hemolytic crisis or aplastic crisis (usually associated with a viral infection). In addition to the hematologic manifestations, serious complications include splenomegaly, which can become evident in early childhood, and cholelithiasis, which usually becomes evident in the second or third decade of life. Typical laboratory findings in EPB42-HS include anemia (decreased hemoglobin [Hgb] level) and reticulocytosis (increased percentage of reticulocytes), with high mean corpuscular Hgb concentration, presence of spherocytes in the peripheral blood smear, significantly decreased or absent haptoglobin, mildly increased osmotic fragility in osmotic fragility assay, increased Omin (osmolality at which 50% of red blood cells hemolyze), and decreased maximal elongation index (EImax) in osmotic gradient ektacytometry.
Hereditary spherocytosis type 4
MedGen UID:
436375
Concept ID:
C2675212
Disease or Syndrome
People with the mild form may have very mild anemia or sometimes have no symptoms. People with the moderate form typically have anemia, jaundice, and splenomegaly. Many also develop gallstones. The signs and symptoms of moderate hereditary spherocytosis usually appear in childhood. Individuals with the moderate/severe form have all the features of the moderate form but also have severe anemia. Those with the severe form have life-threatening anemia that requires frequent blood transfusions to replenish their red blood cell supply. They also have severe splenomegaly, jaundice, and a high risk for developing gallstones. Some individuals with the severe form have short stature, delayed sexual development, and skeletal abnormalities.\n\nThere are four forms of hereditary spherocytosis, which are distinguished by the severity of signs and symptoms. They are known as the mild form, the moderate form, the moderate/severe form, and the severe form. It is estimated that 20 to 30 percent of people with hereditary spherocytosis have the mild form, 60 to 70 percent have the moderate form, 10 percent have the moderate/severe form, and 3 to 5 percent have the severe form.\n\nHereditary spherocytosis is a condition that affects red blood cells. People with this condition typically experience a shortage of red blood cells (anemia), yellowing of the eyes and skin (jaundice), and an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly). Most newborns with hereditary spherocytosis have severe anemia, although it improves after the first year of life. Splenomegaly can occur anytime from early childhood to adulthood. About half of affected individuals develop hard deposits in the gallbladder called gallstones, which typically occur from late childhood to mid-adulthood.
Hemolytic anemia due to adenylate kinase deficiency
MedGen UID:
390802
Concept ID:
C2675459
Disease or Syndrome
A rare hemolytic anemia due to an erythrocyte nucleotide metabolism disorder characterized by moderate to severe chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia that may require regular blood transfusions and/or splenectomy and may be associated with psychomotor impairment.
Primary CD59 deficiency
MedGen UID:
393582
Concept ID:
C2676767
Disease or Syndrome
CD59-mediated hemolytic anemia with immune-mediated polyneuropathy is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by infantile onset of a relapsing-remitting polyneuropathy, often exacerbated by infection, and manifest as hypotonia, limb muscle weakness, and hyporeflexia. Immunosuppressive treatment may result in some clinical improvement (summary by Nevo et al., 2013).
Hereditary spherocytosis type 3
MedGen UID:
394798
Concept ID:
C2678338
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary spherocytosis is a condition that affects red blood cells. People with this condition typically experience a shortage of red blood cells (anemia), yellowing of the eyes and skin (jaundice), and an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly). Most newborns with hereditary spherocytosis have severe anemia, although it improves after the first year of life. Splenomegaly can occur anytime from early childhood to adulthood. About half of affected individuals develop hard deposits in the gallbladder called gallstones, which typically occur from late childhood to mid-adulthood.\n\nThere are four forms of hereditary spherocytosis, which are distinguished by the severity of signs and symptoms. They are known as the mild form, the moderate form, the moderate/severe form, and the severe form. It is estimated that 20 to 30 percent of people with hereditary spherocytosis have the mild form, 60 to 70 percent have the moderate form, 10 percent have the moderate/severe form, and 3 to 5 percent have the severe form.\n\nPeople with the mild form may have very mild anemia or sometimes have no symptoms. People with the moderate form typically have anemia, jaundice, and splenomegaly. Many also develop gallstones. The signs and symptoms of moderate hereditary spherocytosis usually appear in childhood. Individuals with the moderate/severe form have all the features of the moderate form but also have severe anemia. Those with the severe form have life-threatening anemia that requires frequent blood transfusions to replenish their red blood cell supply. They also have severe splenomegaly, jaundice, and a high risk for developing gallstones. Some individuals with the severe form have short stature, delayed sexual development, and skeletal abnormalities.
Elliptocytosis 1
MedGen UID:
394841
Concept ID:
C2678497
Disease or Syndrome
Elliptocytosis is a hematologic disorder characterized by elliptically shaped erythrocytes and a variable degree of hemolytic anemia. Usually inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, elliptocytosis results from mutation in any one of several genes encoding proteins of the red cell membrane skeleton (summary by McGuire et al., 1988). Genetic Heterogeneity of Elliptocytosis Elliptocytosis-2 (130600) is caused by mutation in the SPTA1 gene (182860). Elliptocytosis-3 (617948) is caused by mutation in the SPTB gene (182870). Elliptocytosis-4 (166900), also known as Southeast Asian ovalocytosis, is caused by mutation in the SLC4A1 gene (109270). Also see pyropoikilocytosis (266140). See Delaunay (2007) for a discussion of the molecular basis of hereditary red cell membrane disorders.
Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type 4
MedGen UID:
462276
Concept ID:
C3150926
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type IV (CDAN4) is an autosomal dominant red blood cell disorder characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and hemolysis resulting in anemia. Circulating erythroblasts and erythroblasts in the bone marrow show various morphologic abnormalities. Affected individuals with CDAN4 also have increased levels of fetal hemoglobin (summary by Arnaud et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia, see CDAN1 (224120).
Hemoglobin H disease
MedGen UID:
468531
Concept ID:
C3161174
Disease or Syndrome
Hemoglobin H disease is a subtype of alpha-thalassemia (see 604131) in which patients have compound heterozygosity for alpha(+)-thalassemia, caused by deletion of one alpha-globin gene, and for alpha(0)-thalassemia, caused by deletion in cis of 2 alpha-globin genes (summary by Lal et al., 2011). When 3 alpha-globin genes become inactive because of deletions with or without concomitant nondeletional mutations, the affected individual has only 1 functional alpha-globin gene. These people usually have moderate anemia and marked microcytosis and hypochromia. In affected adults, there is an excess of beta-globin chains within erythrocytes that will form beta-4 tetramers, also known as hemoglobin H (summary by Chui et al., 2003). Hb H disease is usually caused by the combination of alpha(0)-thalassemia with deletional alpha(+)-thalassemia, a combination referred to as 'deletional' Hb H disease. In a smaller proportion of patients, Hb H disease is caused by an alpha(0)-thalassemia plus an alpha(+)-thalassemia point mutation or small insertion/deletion. Such a situation is labeled 'nondeletional' Hb H disease. Patients with nondeletional Hb H disease are usually more anemic, more symptomatic, more prone to have significant hepatosplenomegaly, and more likely to require transfusions (summary by Lal et al., 2011).
Bernard-Soulier syndrome, type A2, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
478706
Concept ID:
C3277076
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant Bernard-Soulier syndrome type A2 (BSSA2) is characterized by chronic macrothrombocytopenia with mild or no clinical symptoms, normal platelet function, and normal megakaryocyte count. When present, clinical findings include excessive ecchymoses, frequent epistaxis, gingival bleeding, prolonged menstrual periods, or prolonged bleeding after tooth extraction (Savoia et al., 2001). Genetic Heterogeneity of Bernard-Soulier Syndrome Homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the GP1BA gene cause classic autosomal recessive Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSSA1; 231200).
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
761287
Concept ID:
C3539013
Disease or Syndrome
Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical disability. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with pathogenic variants in the AGS-related genes is not yet known.
Immunoglobulin-mediated membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis
MedGen UID:
767244
Concept ID:
C3554330
Disease or Syndrome
C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) is a complex ultra-rare complement-mediated renal disease caused by uncontrolled activation of the complement alternative pathway (AP) in the fluid phase (as opposed to cell surface) that is rarely inherited in a simple mendelian fashion. C3G affects individuals of all ages, with a median age at diagnosis of 23 years. Individuals with C3G typically present with hematuria, proteinuria, hematuria and proteinuria, acute nephritic syndrome or nephrotic syndrome, and low levels of the complement component C3. Spontaneous remission of C3G is uncommon, and about half of affected individuals develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD) within ten years of diagnosis, occasionally developing the late comorbidity of impaired visual acuity.
Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria 2
MedGen UID:
815699
Concept ID:
C3809369
Disease or Syndrome
Any paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PIGT gene.
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 7
MedGen UID:
854829
Concept ID:
C3888244
Disease or Syndrome
Most characteristically, Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) manifests as an early-onset encephalopathy that usually, but not always, results in severe intellectual and physical disability. A subgroup of infants with AGS present at birth with abnormal neurologic findings, hepatosplenomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, and thrombocytopenia, a picture highly suggestive of congenital infection. Otherwise, most affected infants present at variable times after the first few weeks of life, frequently after a period of apparently normal development. Typically, they demonstrate the subacute onset of a severe encephalopathy characterized by extreme irritability, intermittent sterile pyrexias, loss of skills, and slowing of head growth. Over time, as many as 40% develop chilblain skin lesions on the fingers, toes, and ears. It is becoming apparent that atypical, sometimes milder, cases of AGS exist, and thus the true extent of the phenotype associated with pathogenic variants in the AGS-related genes is not yet known.
Immunodeficiency 23
MedGen UID:
862808
Concept ID:
C4014371
Disease or Syndrome
IMD23 is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by onset of recurrent infections, usually respiratory or cutaneous, in early childhood. Immune workup usually shows neutropenia, lymphopenia, eosinophilia, and increased serum IgE or IgA. Neutrophil chemotactic defects have also been reported. Infectious agents include bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Many patients develop atopic dermatitis, eczema, and other signs of autoinflammation. Affected individuals may also show developmental delay or cognitive impairment of varying severity (summary by Bjorksten and Lundmark, 1976 and Zhang et al., 2014).
Autoinflammatory syndrome, familial, Behcet-like 1
MedGen UID:
898541
Concept ID:
C4225218
Disease or Syndrome
Familial Behcet-like autoinflammatory syndrome-1 (AIFBL1) is an autosomal dominant monogenic autoinflammatory disease characterized predominantly by painful and recurrent mucosal ulceration affecting the oral mucosa, gastrointestinal tract, and genital areas. The onset of symptoms is usually in the first decade, although later onset has been reported. Additional more variable features include skin rash, uveitis, and polyarthritis, consistent with a systemic hyperinflammatory state. Many patients have evidence of autoimmune disease. Rare patients may also have concurrent features of immunodeficiency, including recurrent infections with low numbers of certain white blood cells or impaired function of immune cells. The disorder results from a failure of mutant TNFAIP3 to suppress the activation of inflammatory cytokines in the NFKB (see 164011) signaling pathway; treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNFA; 191160) inhibitors may be beneficial. Although some of the clinical features of AIFBL1 resemble those of Behcet disease (109650), the more common form of Behcet disease is believed to be polygenic, typically shows later onset in early adulthood, and has symptoms usually restricted to the mucosa (summary by Zhou et al., 2016; Aeschlimann et al., 2018, and Kadowaki et al., 2018). Genetic Heterogeneity of AIFBL See also AIFBL2 (301074), caused by mutation in the ELF4 gene (300775) on chromosome Xq26, and AIFBL3 (618287), caused by mutation in the RELA gene (164014) on chromosome 11q13.
Dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis 2
MedGen UID:
908701
Concept ID:
C4225242
Disease or Syndrome
In dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (DHS), also known as hereditary xerocytosis, red blood cells exhibit altered intracellular cation content and cellular dehydration, resulting in increased erythrocyte mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and decreased erythrocyte osmotic fragility. Blood films show various cell shape abnormalities, the most characteristic being the stomatocyte, with a straight or crescent-shaped central pallor (summary by Rapetti-Mauss et al., 2015). For discussion of clinical and genetic heterogeneity of the stomatocytoses, see DHS1 (194380).
Brain small vessel disease 1 with or without ocular anomalies
MedGen UID:
1647320
Concept ID:
C4551998
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of COL4A1-related disorders includes: small-vessel brain disease of varying severity including porencephaly, variably associated with eye defects (retinal arterial tortuosity, Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly, cataract) and systemic findings (kidney involvement, muscle cramps, cerebral aneurysms, Raynaud phenomenon, cardiac arrhythmia, and hemolytic anemia). On imaging studies, small-vessel brain disease is manifest as diffuse periventricular leukoencephalopathy, lacunar infarcts, microhemorrhage, dilated perivascular spaces, and deep intracerebral hemorrhages. Clinically, small-vessel brain disease manifests as infantile hemiparesis, seizures, single or recurrent hemorrhagic stroke, ischemic stroke, and isolated migraine with aura. Porencephaly (fluid-filled cavities in the brain detected by CT or MRI) is typically manifest as infantile hemiparesis, seizures, and intellectual disability; however, on occasion it can be an incidental finding. HANAC (hereditary angiopathy with nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps) syndrome usually associates asymptomatic small-vessel brain disease, cerebral large vessel involvement (i.e., aneurysms), and systemic findings involving the kidney, muscle, and small vessels of the eye. Two additional phenotypes include isolated retinal artery tortuosity and nonsyndromic autosomal dominant congenital cataract.
Protoporphyria, erythropoietic, 1
MedGen UID:
1643471
Concept ID:
C4692546
Disease or Syndrome
Erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP) is characterized by cutaneous photosensitivity (usually beginning in infancy or childhood) that results in tingling, burning, pain, and itching within 30 minutes after exposure to sun or ultraviolet light and may be accompanied by swelling and redness. Symptoms (which may seem out of proportion to the visible skin lesions) may persist for hours or days after the initial phototoxic reaction. Photosensitivity remains for life. Multiple episodes of acute photosensitivity may lead to chronic changes of sun-exposed skin (lichenification, leathery pseudovesicles, grooving around the lips) and loss of lunulae of the nails. Approximately 20%-30% of individuals with EPP have some degree of liver dysfunction, which is typically mild with slight elevations of the liver enzymes. Up to 5% may develop more advanced liver disease which may be accompanied by motor neuropathy similar to that seen in the acute porphyrias.
RH-NULL, AMORPH TYPE
MedGen UID:
1639338
Concept ID:
C4693796
Disease or Syndrome
The RH-null phenotype designates rare individuals whose red blood cells lack all Rh antigens. Two RH-null types, the regulator type (RHNR; 268150) and the amorph type (RHNA), arising from independent genetic mechanisms have been distinguished. The regulator type is caused by mutation in the RHAG gene (180297). The amorph type arises from mutations at the RH locus itself that silence Rh expression. The RH locus contains the RHD (111680) and RHCE genes tandemly arranged at chromosome 1p36-p34. Four genes must therefore be silenced to produce the RH-null phenotype. The absence of the D antigen, produced by the RHD gene, is common in the human population; the D-negative phenotype may result from deletion or genetic alteration of the RHD gene. The RH-null amorph phenotype thus arises from inactivating mutations in RHCE on a D-negative background (summary by Huang et al., 1998 and Huang et al., 2000). Clinically, Rh-null patients present mild to moderate hemolytic anemia; cells exhibit characteristic morphologic and functional abnormalities including spherocytosis, stomatocytosis, and diminished lifespan. Rh-null patients rarely develop antibodies without stimulation, and most cases occur in response to pregnancy or transfusion (Silvy et al., 2015).
X-linked congenital hemolytic anemia
MedGen UID:
1648376
Concept ID:
C4746970
Disease or Syndrome
Fibrosis, neurodegeneration, and cerebral angiomatosis
MedGen UID:
1648312
Concept ID:
C4748939
Disease or Syndrome
Fibrosis, neurodegeneration, and cerebral angiomatosis (FINCA) is characterized by severe progressive cerebropulmonary symptoms, resulting in death in infancy from respiratory failure. Features include malabsorption, progressive growth failure, recurrent infections, chronic hemolytic anemia, and transient liver dysfunction. Neuropathology shows increased angiomatosis-like leptomeningeal, cortical, and superficial white matter vascularization and congestion, vacuolar degeneration and myelin loss in white matter, as well as neuronal degeneration. Interstitial fibrosis and granuloma-like lesions are seen in the lungs, and there is hepatomegaly with steatosis and collagen accumulation (Uusimaa et al., 2018).
Granulomatous disease, chronic, autosomal recessive, 5
MedGen UID:
1710326
Concept ID:
C5394542
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival.
Renal tubular acidosis, distal, 4, with hemolytic anemia
MedGen UID:
1771439
Concept ID:
C5436235
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with hereditary distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) typically present in infancy with failure to thrive, although later presentations can occur, especially in individuals with autosomal dominant SLC4A1-dRTA. Initial clinical manifestations can also include emesis, polyuria, polydipsia, constipation, diarrhea, decreased appetite, and episodes of dehydration. Electrolyte manifestations include hyperchloremic non-anion gap metabolic acidosis and hypokalemia. Renal complications of dRTA include nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, medullary cysts, and impaired renal function. Additional manifestations include bone demineralization (rickets, osteomalacia), growth deficiency, sensorineural hearing loss (in ATP6V0A4-, ATP6V1B1-, and FOXI1-dRTA), and hereditary hemolytic anemia (in some individuals with SLC4A1-dRTA).
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 9
MedGen UID:
1794176
Concept ID:
C5561966
Disease or Syndrome
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome-9 (AGS9) is a type I interferonopathy characterized by severe developmental delay and progressive neurologic deterioration. Patients present in infancy with irritability and spasticity. Brain imaging shows diffusely abnormal white matter, cerebral atrophy, and intracranial calcification. Premature death has been associated with renal and/or hepatic failure (Uggenti et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, see AGS1 (225750).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and dysmorphic facies
MedGen UID:
1794184
Concept ID:
C5561974
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and dysmorphic facies (NEDHYDF) is characterized by global developmental delay and hypotonia apparent from birth. Affected individuals have variably impaired intellectual development, often with speech delay and delayed walking. Seizures are generally not observed, although some patients may have single seizures or late-onset epilepsy. Most patients have prominent dysmorphic facial features. Additional features may include congenital cardiac defects (without arrhythmia), nonspecific renal anomalies, joint contractures or joint hyperextensibility, dry skin, and cryptorchidism. There is significant phenotypic variability in both the neurologic and extraneurologic manifestations (summary by Tan et al., 2022).
Immunodeficiency 87 and autoimmunity
MedGen UID:
1794280
Concept ID:
C5562070
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-87 and autoimmunity (IMD87) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder with wide phenotypic variation and severity. Affected individuals usually present in infancy or early childhood with increased susceptibility to infections, often Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), as well as with lymphadenopathy or autoimmune manifestations, predominantly hemolytic anemia. Laboratory studies may show low or normal lymphocyte numbers, often with skewed T-cell subset ratios. The disorder results primarily from defects in T-cell function, which causes both immunodeficiency and overall immune dysregulation (summary by Serwas et al., 2019 and Fournier et al., 2021).
Anemia, congenital dyserythropoietic, type 1a
MedGen UID:
1807106
Concept ID:
C5574667
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I (CDA I) is characterized by moderate-to-severe macrocytic anemia presenting occasionally in utero as severe anemia associated with hydrops fetalis but more commonly in neonates as hepatomegaly, early jaundice, and intrauterine growth restriction. Some individuals present in childhood or adulthood. After the neonatal period, most affected individuals have lifelong moderate anemia, usually accompanied by jaundice and splenomegaly. Secondary hemochromatosis develops with age as a result of increased iron absorption even in those who are not transfused. Distal limb anomalies occur in 4%-14% of affected individuals.
Hemolytic uremic syndrome, atypical, 8, with rhizomelic short stature
MedGen UID:
1840221
Concept ID:
C5829585
Disease or Syndrome
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome-8 with rhizomelic short stature (AHUS8) is an X-linked disorder with variable manifestations. The age at onset of renal symptoms is variable, ranging from infancy to the early twenties. Features of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) include acute renal dysfunction with proteinuria, thrombotic microangiopathy, anemia, thrombocytopenia, increased serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and schistocytes on peripheral blood smear. Affected individuals also have short stature with short limbs. More variable features include immunodeficiency with recurrent infections, developmental delay, and dysmorphic features. Treatment with C5 inhibitors results in improvement of renal function. Female carriers may show an attenuated phenotype (Hadar et al., 2023; Erger et al., 2023). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of aHUS, see AHUS1 (235400).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Liu Y, Thaker H, Wang C, Xu Z, Dong M
Toxins (Basel) 2022 Dec 23;15(1) doi: 10.3390/toxins15010010. PMID: 36668830Free PMC Article
Scheckel CJ, Go RS
Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2022 Apr;36(2):315-324. Epub 2022 Mar 11 doi: 10.1016/j.hoc.2021.12.001. PMID: 35282951
Jäger U, Barcellini W, Broome CM, Gertz MA, Hill A, Hill QA, Jilma B, Kuter DJ, Michel M, Montillo M, Röth A, Zeerleder SS, Berentsen S
Blood Rev 2020 May;41:100648. Epub 2019 Dec 5 doi: 10.1016/j.blre.2019.100648. PMID: 31839434

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Loriamini M, Cserti-Gazdewich C, Branch DR
Int J Mol Sci 2024 Apr 12;25(8) doi: 10.3390/ijms25084296. PMID: 38673882Free PMC Article
Mulder FVM, Evers D, de Haas M, Cruijsen MJ, Bernelot Moens SJ, Barcellini W, Fattizzo B, Vos JMI
Front Immunol 2023;14:1228142. Epub 2023 Sep 18 doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2023.1228142. PMID: 37795092Free PMC Article
Barcellini W, Fattizzo B
Blood 2021 Mar 11;137(10):1283-1294. doi: 10.1182/blood.2019003808. PMID: 33512406
Barcellini W, Fattizzo B
Front Immunol 2020;11:946. Epub 2020 Jun 3 doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2020.00946. PMID: 32655543Free PMC Article
Carmi O, Berla M, Shoenfeld Y, Levy Y
Expert Rev Hematol 2017 Apr;10(4):365-374. Epub 2017 Mar 13 doi: 10.1080/17474086.2017.1300522. PMID: 28277850

Diagnosis

Scheckel CJ, Go RS
Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2022 Apr;36(2):315-324. Epub 2022 Mar 11 doi: 10.1016/j.hoc.2021.12.001. PMID: 35282951
Michel M
Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2022 Apr;36(2):381-392. Epub 2022 Mar 11 doi: 10.1016/j.hoc.2021.12.004. PMID: 35282950
Berentsen S, Barcellini W
N Engl J Med 2021 Oct 7;385(15):1407-1419. doi: 10.1056/NEJMra2033982. PMID: 34614331
Hill A, Hill QA
Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program 2018 Nov 30;2018(1):382-389. doi: 10.1182/asheducation-2018.1.382. PMID: 30504336Free PMC Article
Phillips J, Henderson AC
Am Fam Physician 2018 Sep 15;98(6):354-361. PMID: 30215915

Therapy

Argüello Marina M, López Rubio M, Castilla García L
Med Clin (Barc) 2023 Jan 5;160(1):30-38. Epub 2022 Nov 2 doi: 10.1016/j.medcli.2022.07.021. PMID: 36334945
Barcellini W, Fattizzo B
Blood 2021 Mar 11;137(10):1283-1294. doi: 10.1182/blood.2019003808. PMID: 33512406
Grace RF, Barcellini W
Blood 2020 Sep 10;136(11):1241-1249. doi: 10.1182/blood.2019000945. PMID: 32702739
Scully M, Cataland SR, Peyvandi F, Coppo P, Knöbl P, Kremer Hovinga JA, Metjian A, de la Rubia J, Pavenski K, Callewaert F, Biswas D, De Winter H, Zeldin RK; HERCULES Investigators
N Engl J Med 2019 Jan 24;380(4):335-346. Epub 2019 Jan 9 doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1806311. PMID: 30625070
Hill A, Hill QA
Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program 2018 Nov 30;2018(1):382-389. doi: 10.1182/asheducation-2018.1.382. PMID: 30504336Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Maharaj S, Murray D, Chang S, Cisak K
Cleve Clin J Med 2020 Nov 2;87(11):649-650. doi: 10.3949/ccjm.87a.20044. PMID: 33139258
Berentsen S, Barcellini W, D'Sa S, Randen U, Tvedt THA, Fattizzo B, Haukås E, Kell M, Brudevold R, Dahm AEA, Dalgaard J, Frøen H, Hallstensen RF, Jæger PH, Hjorth-Hansen H, Małecka A, Oksman M, Rolke J, Sekhar M, Sørbø JH, Tjønnfjord E, Tsykunova G, Tjønnfjord GE
Blood 2020 Jul 23;136(4):480-488. doi: 10.1182/blood.2020005674. PMID: 32374875
Ho G, Brunson A, Keegan THM, Wun T
Blood Cells Mol Dis 2020 Mar;81:102388. Epub 2019 Nov 28 doi: 10.1016/j.bcmd.2019.102388. PMID: 31805473
Keyserling K, Koprowski S
N Engl J Med 2018 Aug 23;379(8):774. doi: 10.1056/NEJMicm1714572. PMID: 30134135
Guo Y, Tian X, Wang X, Xiao Z
Front Immunol 2018;9:1299. Epub 2018 Jun 8 doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2018.01299. PMID: 29951056Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Mulder FVM, Evers D, de Haas M, Cruijsen MJ, Bernelot Moens SJ, Barcellini W, Fattizzo B, Vos JMI
Front Immunol 2023;14:1228142. Epub 2023 Sep 18 doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2023.1228142. PMID: 37795092Free PMC Article
Wu Y, Liao L, Lin F
J Clin Lab Anal 2021 Dec;35(12):e24034. Epub 2021 Oct 24 doi: 10.1002/jcla.24034. PMID: 34689357Free PMC Article
Barcellini W, Fattizzo B
Front Immunol 2020;11:946. Epub 2020 Jun 3 doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2020.00946. PMID: 32655543Free PMC Article
Gupta M, Feinberg BB, Burwick RM
Pregnancy Hypertens 2018 Apr;12:29-34. Epub 2018 Feb 16 doi: 10.1016/j.preghy.2018.02.007. PMID: 29674195
Velo-García A, Castro SG, Isenberg DA
J Autoimmun 2016 Nov;74:139-160. Epub 2016 Jul 25 doi: 10.1016/j.jaut.2016.07.001. PMID: 27461045

Recent systematic reviews

Jafarzadeh A, Jafarzadeh S, Pardehshenas M, Nemati M, Mortazavi SMJ
Int J Lab Hematol 2023 Apr;45(2):145-155. Epub 2022 Oct 8 doi: 10.1111/ijlh.13978. PMID: 36208056Free PMC Article
Aziz H, Brown ZJ, Baghdadi A, Kamel IR, Pawlik TM
J Gastrointest Surg 2022 Sep;26(9):1998-2007. Epub 2022 Jun 15 doi: 10.1007/s11605-022-05382-1. PMID: 35705835
Kaegi C, Wuest B, Schreiner J, Steiner UC, Vultaggio A, Matucci A, Crowley C, Boyman O
Front Immunol 2019;10:1990. Epub 2019 Sep 6 doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2019.01990. PMID: 31555262Free PMC Article
Hill QA, Hill A, Berentsen S
Blood Adv 2019 Jun 25;3(12):1897-1906. doi: 10.1182/bloodadvances.2019000036. PMID: 31235526Free PMC Article
Kandler MR, Mah GT, Tejani AM, Stabler SN, Salzwedel DM
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2011 Nov 9;(11):CD004934. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD004934.pub4. PMID: 22071816

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