NCBI Bookshelf. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

Cover of Screening for Breast Cancer: A Comparative Effectiveness Review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

Screening for Breast Cancer: A Comparative Effectiveness Review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

Evidence Synthesis, No. 231

Authors

Investigators: , PhD, MPH, , MS, , MPH, , MS, and , MD, MPH.

Rockville (MD): Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US); .
Report No.: 23-05303-EF-1

We conducted this systematic review to support the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) in updating its recommendations on breast cancer screening. Our review addresses the comparative effectiveness of breast cancer screening for improving health outcomes. The review compares different strategies regarding when to screen (e.g., age to start/stop screening, screening interval), screening modalities (e.g., digital breast tomosynthesis [DBT] versus digital mammography [DM]), supplemental screening, or screening strategies defined by breast cancer risk markers.

Contents

Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; www.ahrq.gov Contract No. 75Q80120D00004, Task Order No. 75Q80121F32004 Prepared by: Kaiser Permanente Evidence-based Practice Center, Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, Portland, OR

Suggested citation:

Henderson JT, Webber EM, Weyrich M, Miller M, Melnikow J. Screening for Breast Cancer: A Comparative Effectiveness Review for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Evidence Synthesis No. 231. AHRQ Publication No. 23-05303-EF-1. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; 2024.

This report is based on research conducted by the Kaiser Permanente Research Affiliates Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) under contract to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Rockville, MD (Contract No. 75Q80120D00004, Task Order No. 75Q80121F32004). The findings and conclusions in this document are those of the authors, who are responsible for its contents; the findings and conclusions do not necessarily represent the views of AHRQ. Therefore, no statement in this report should be construed as an official position of AHRQ or of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The information in this report is intended to help health care decisionmakers—patients and clinicians, health system leaders, and policymakers, among others—make well-informed decisions and thereby improve the quality of health care services. This report is not intended to be a substitute for the application of clinical judgment. Anyone who makes decisions concerning the provision of clinical care should consider this report in the same way as any medical reference and in conjunction with all other pertinent information (i.e., in the context of available resources and circumstances presented by individual patients).

This report may be used, in whole or in part, as the basis for development of clinical practice guidelines and other quality enhancement tools, or as a basis for reimbursement and coverage policies. AHRQ or U.S. Department of Health and Human Services endorsement of such derivative products may not be stated or implied.

Bookshelf ID: NBK603789PMID: 38768286