U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Recurrent fever

MedGen UID:
811468
Concept ID:
C3714772
Sign or Symptom
Synonym: Episodic fever
 
HPO: HP:0001954

Definition

Periodic (episodic or recurrent) bouts of fever. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Familial dysautonomia
MedGen UID:
41678
Concept ID:
C0013364
Disease or Syndrome
Familial dysautonomia, which affects the development and survival of sensory, sympathetic, and parasympathetic neurons, is a debilitating disorder present from birth. Neuronal degeneration progresses throughout life. Affected individuals have gastrointestinal dysfunction, autonomic crises (i.e., hypertensive vomiting attacks), recurrent pneumonia, altered pain sensitivity, altered temperature perception, and blood pressure instability. Hypotonia contributes to delay in acquisition of motor milestones. Optic neuropathy results in progressive vision loss. Older individuals often have a broad-based and ataxic gait that deteriorates over time. Developmental delay / intellectual disability occur in about 21% of individuals. Life expectancy is decreased.
Hereditary insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis
MedGen UID:
6915
Concept ID:
C0020074
Disease or Syndrome
NTRK1 congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (NTRK1-CIPA) is characterized by insensitivity to pain, anhidrosis (the inability to sweat), and intellectual disability. The ability to sense all pain (including visceral pain) is absent, resulting in repeated injuries including: oral self-mutilation (biting of tongue, lips, and buccal mucosa); biting of fingertips; bruising, scarring, and infection of the skin; multiple bone fractures (many of which fail to heal properly); and recurrent joint dislocations resulting in joint deformity. Sense of touch, vibration, and position are normal. Anhidrosis predisposes to recurrent febrile episodes that are often the initial manifestation of NTRK1-CIPA. Hypothermia in cold environments also occurs. Intellectual disability of varying degree is observed in most affected individuals; hyperactivity and emotional lability are common.
Congenital sensory neuropathy with selective loss of small myelinated fibers
MedGen UID:
6916
Concept ID:
C0020075
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V (HSAN5) is a condition that primarily affects the sensory nerve cells (sensory neurons), which transmit information about sensations such as pain, temperature, and touch. These sensations are impaired in people with HSAN5.\n\nThe signs and symptoms of HSAN5 appear early, usually at birth or during infancy. People with HSAN5 lose the ability to feel pain, heat, and cold. Deep pain perception, the feeling of pain from injuries to bones, ligaments, or muscles, is especially affected in people with HSAN5. Because of the inability to feel deep pain, affected individuals suffer repeated severe injuries such as bone fractures and joint injuries that go unnoticed. Repeated trauma can lead to a condition called Charcot joints, in which the bones and tissue surrounding joints are destroyed.
Galactosylceramide beta-galactosidase deficiency
MedGen UID:
44131
Concept ID:
C0023521
Disease or Syndrome
Krabbe disease comprises a spectrum ranging from infantile-onset disease (i.e., onset of extreme irritability, spasticity, and developmental delay before age 12 months) to later-onset disease (i.e., onset of manifestations after age 12 months and as late as the seventh decade). Although historically 85%-90% of symptomatic individuals with Krabbe disease diagnosed by enzyme activity alone have infantile-onset Krabbe disease and 10%-15% have later-onset Krabbe disease, the experience with newborn screening (NBS) suggests that the proportion of individuals with possible later-onset Krabbe disease is higher than previously thought. Infantile-onset Krabbe disease is characterized by normal development in the first few months followed by rapid severe neurologic deterioration; the average age of death is 24 months (range 8 months to 9 years). Later-onset Krabbe disease is much more variable in its presentation and disease course.
Familial Mediterranean fever
MedGen UID:
45811
Concept ID:
C0031069
Disease or Syndrome
Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is divided into two phenotypes: type 1 and type 2. FMF type 1 is characterized by recurrent short episodes of inflammation and serositis including fever, peritonitis, synovitis, pleuritis, and, rarely, pericarditis and meningitis. The symptoms and severity vary among affected individuals, sometimes even among members of the same family. Amyloidosis, which can lead to renal failure, is the most severe complication, if untreated. FMF type 2 is characterized by amyloidosis as the first clinical manifestation of FMF in an otherwise asymptomatic individual.
Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis
MedGen UID:
43097
Concept ID:
C0085077
Disease or Syndrome
Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (AFND) is an autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder characterized by onset of recurrent fever and dermatologic abnormalities in childhood. Laboratory studies show elevated acute-phase reactants and activation of the inflammatory response, particularly IL1B (147720). Additional more variable features may include myalgia and arthralgia (summary by Masters et al., 2016).
Farber lipogranulomatosis
MedGen UID:
78654
Concept ID:
C0268255
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of ASAH1-related disorders ranges from Farber disease (FD) to spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME). Classic FD is characterized by onset in the first weeks of life of painful, progressive deformity of the major joints; palpable subcutaneous nodules of joints and mechanical pressure points; and a hoarse cry resulting from granulomas of the larynx and epiglottis. Life expectancy is usually less than two years. In the other less common types of FD, onset, severity, and primary manifestations vary. SMA-PME is characterized by early-childhood-onset progressive lower motor neuron disease manifest typically between ages three and seven years as proximal lower-extremity weakness, followed by progressive myoclonic and atonic seizures, tremulousness/tremor, and sensorineural hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy typically begins in late childhood after the onset of weakness and can include jerking of the upper limbs, action myoclonus, myoclonic status, and eyelid myoclonus. Other findings include generalized tremor, and cognitive decline. The time from disease onset to death from respiratory complications is usually five to 15 years.
Corticosterone 18-monooxygenase deficiency
MedGen UID:
82784
Concept ID:
C0268293
Disease or Syndrome
CMO type I deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a defect in the penultimate biochemical step of aldosterone biosynthesis, the 18-hydroxylation of corticosterone (B) to 18-hydroxycorticosterone (18-OHB). This enzymatic defect results in decreased aldosterone and salt-wasting. In CMO I deficiency, aldosterone is undetectable, whereas its immediate precursor, 18-OHB, is low or normal. These patients have an increased ratio of corticosterone to 18-OHB (Portrat-Doyen et al., 1998). The CYP11B2 gene product also catalyzes the final step in aldosterone biosynthesis: the 18-oxidation of 18-OHB to aldosterone. A defect in that enzymatic step results in CMO type II deficiency (610600), an allelic disorder with an overlapping phenotype but distinct biochemical features. In CMO II deficiency, aldosterone can be low or normal, but at the expense of increased secretion of 18-OHB. These patients have a low ratio of corticosterone to 18-OHB (Portrat-Doyen et al., 1998).
Familial amyloid nephropathy with urticaria AND deafness
MedGen UID:
120634
Concept ID:
C0268390
Disease or Syndrome
Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) is characterized by episodic skin rash, arthralgias, and fever associated with late-onset sensorineural deafness and renal amyloidosis (Dode et al., 2002).
Familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia
MedGen UID:
75681
Concept ID:
C0268450
Disease or Syndrome
Gitelman syndrome (GTLMNS) is an autosomal recessive renal tubular salt-wasting disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis with hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. It is the most common renal tubular disorder among Caucasians (prevalence of 1 in 40,000). Most patients have onset of symptoms as adults, but some present in childhood. Clinical features include transient periods of muscle weakness and tetany, abdominal pains, and chondrocalcinosis (summary by Glaudemans et al., 2012). Gitelman syndrome is sometimes referred to as a mild variant of classic Bartter syndrome (607364). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bartter syndrome, see 607364.
Dihydropteridine reductase deficiency
MedGen UID:
75682
Concept ID:
C0268465
Disease or Syndrome
Tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency is a rare disorder characterized by a shortage (deficiency) of a molecule called tetrahydrobiopterin or BH4. This condition alters the levels of several substances in the body, including phenylalanine. Phenylalanine is a building block of proteins (an amino acid) that is obtained through the diet. It is found in foods that contain protein and in some artificial sweeteners. High levels of phenylalanine are present from early infancy in people with untreated tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency. This condition also alters the levels of chemicals called neurotransmitters, which transmit signals between nerve cells in the brain.\n\nInfants with tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency appear normal at birth, but medical problems ranging from mild to severe become apparent over time. Signs and symptoms of this condition can include intellectual disability, progressive problems with development, movement disorders, difficulty swallowing, seizures, behavioral problems, and an inability to control body temperature.
Lazy leukocyte syndrome
MedGen UID:
78795
Concept ID:
C0272174
Disease or Syndrome
Periodic fever, immunodeficiency, and thrombocytopenia syndrome (PFITS) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder with variable manifestations. Common features include early-onset recurrent respiratory infections, stomatitis, and cutaneous infections. Organisms usually include bacteria such as pneumococcus, Staphylococcus, and H. influenzae, but severe viral infections, including varicella, may also occur. Laboratory investigations may show neutropenia, neutrophilia, leukocytosis, or lymphopenia, although levels of immune cells may also be normal. Detailed studies often show impaired neutrophil chemotaxis associated with increased or abnormal F-actin levels, and impaired, normal, or even increased oxidative burst, depending on the stimulus. B- and T-cell abnormalities have also been observed. Some patients develop autoimmune manifestations, including chronic thrombocytopenia, anemia, and periodic fevers, associated with activation of the inflammasome. Early death may occur; however, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be curative (summary by Kuhns et al., 2016, Standing et al., 2017, and Pfajfer et al., 2018).
Hyperimmunoglobulin D with periodic fever
MedGen UID:
140768
Concept ID:
C0398691
Disease or Syndrome
Mevalonate kinase deficiency is a condition characterized by recurrent episodes of fever, which typically begin during infancy. Each episode of fever lasts about 3 to 6 days, and the frequency of the episodes varies among affected individuals. In childhood the fevers seem to be more frequent, occurring as often as 25 times a year, but as the individual gets older the episodes occur less often.\n\nMevalonate kinase deficiency has additional signs and symptoms, and the severity depends on the type of the condition. There are two types of mevalonate kinase deficiency: a less severe type called hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome (HIDS) and a more severe type called mevalonic aciduria (MVA).\n\nPeople with MVA have signs and symptoms of the condition at all times, not just during episodes of fever. Affected children have developmental delay, problems with movement and balance (ataxia), recurrent seizures (epilepsy), progressive problems with vision, and failure to gain weight and grow at the expected rate (failure to thrive). Individuals with MVA typically have an unusually small, elongated head. In childhood or adolescence, affected individuals may develop eye problems such as inflammation of the eye (uveitis), a blue tint in the white part of the eye (blue sclera), an eye disorder called retinitis pigmentosa that causes vision loss, or clouding of the lens of the eye (cataracts). Affected adults may have short stature and may develop muscle weakness (myopathy) later in life. During fever episodes, people with MVA may have an enlarged liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly), lymphadenopathy, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and skin rashes. Children with MVA who are severely affected with multiple problems may live only into early childhood; mildly affected individuals may have a normal life expectancy.\n\nDuring episodes of fever, people with HIDS typically have enlargement of the lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy), abdominal pain, joint pain, diarrhea, skin rashes, and headache. Occasionally they will have painful sores called aphthous ulcers around their mouth. In females, these may also occur around the vagina. Rarely, people with HIDS develop a buildup of protein deposits (amyloidosis) in the kidneys that can lead to kidney failure. Fever episodes in individuals with HIDS can be triggered by vaccinations, surgery, injury, or stress. Most people with HIDS have abnormally high levels of immune system proteins called immunoglobulin D (IgD) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) in the blood. It is unclear why some people with HIDS have high levels of IgD and IgA and some do not. Elevated levels of these immunoglobulins do not appear to cause any signs or symptoms. Individuals with HIDS do not have any signs and symptoms of the condition between fever episodes and typically have a normal life expectancy.
Chronic infantile neurological, cutaneous and articular syndrome
MedGen UID:
98370
Concept ID:
C0409818
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular syndrome (CINCA) is an early-onset, severe, chronic inflammatory disease, characterized by cutaneous symptoms, central nervous system involvement, and arthropathy (Feldmann et al., 2002). See also familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome-1 (FCAS1, CAPS1; 120100), an allelic disorder with a less severe phenotype.
6-Pyruvoyl-tetrahydrobiopterin synthase deficiency
MedGen UID:
209234
Concept ID:
C0878676
Disease or Syndrome
Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)-deficient hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) comprises a genetically heterogeneous group of progressive neurologic disorders caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the genes encoding enzymes involved in the synthesis or regeneration of BH4. BH4 is a cofactor for phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH; 612349), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; 191290) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH1; 191060), the latter 2 of which are involved in neurotransmitter synthesis. The BH4-deficient HPAs are characterized phenotypically by hyperphenylalaninemia, depletion of the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin, and progressive cognitive and motor deficits (Dudesek et al., 2001). HPABH4A, caused by mutations in the PTS gene, represents the most common cause of BH4-deficient hyperphenylalaninemia (Dudesek et al., 2001). Other forms of BH4-deficient HPA include HPABH4B (233910), caused by mutation in the GCH1 gene (600225), HPABH4C (261630), caused by mutation in the QDPR gene (612676), and HPABH4D (264070), caused by mutation in the PCBD1 gene (126090). Niederwieser et al. (1982) noted that about 1 to 3% of patients with hyperphenylalaninemia have one of these BH4-deficient forms. These disorders are clinically and genetically distinct from classic phenylketonuria (PKU; 261600), caused by mutation in the PAH gene. Two additional disorders associated with BH4 deficiency and neurologic symptoms do not have overt hyperphenylalaninemia as a feature: dopa-responsive dystonia (612716), caused by mutation in the SPR gene (182125), and autosomal dominant dopa-responsive dystonia (DYT5; 128230), caused by mutation in the GCH1 gene. Patients with these disorders may develop hyperphenylalaninemia when stressed.
TNF receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS)
MedGen UID:
226899
Concept ID:
C1275126
Disease or Syndrome
Familial periodic fever (FPF) is an autoinflammatory disorder characterized by recurrent fever with localized myalgia and painful erythema. Febrile attacks may last 1 or 2 days but often last longer than 1 week. Arthralgia of large joints, abdominal pain, conjunctivitis, and periorbital edema are common features. During attacks, painless cutaneous lesions may develop on the trunk or extremities and may migrate distally (review by Drenth and van der Meer, 2001).
X-linked lymphoproliferative disease due to XIAP deficiency
MedGen UID:
336848
Concept ID:
C1845076
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) has two recognizable subtypes, XLP1 and XLP2. XLP1 is characterized predominantly by one of three commonly recognized phenotypes: Inappropriate immune response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection leading to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) or severe mononucleosis. Dysgammaglobulinemia. Lymphoproliferative disease (malignant lymphoma). XLP2 is most often characterized by HLH (often associated with EBV), dysgammaglobulinemia, and inflammatory bowel disease. HLH resulting from EBV infection is associated with an unregulated and exaggerated immune response with widespread proliferation of cytotoxic T cells, EBV-infected B cells, and macrophages. Dysgammaglobulinemia is typically hypogammaglobulinemia of one or more immunoglobulin subclasses. The malignant lymphomas are typically B-cell lymphomas, non-Hodgkin type, often extranodal, and in particular involving the intestine.
Cold-induced sweating syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
338577
Concept ID:
C1848947
Disease or Syndrome
Cold-induced sweating syndrome (CISS) and its infantile presentation, Crisponi syndrome(CS) is characterized by dysmorphic features (distinctive facies, lower facial weakness, flexion deformity at the elbows, camptodactyly with fisted hands, misshapen feet, and overriding toes); intermittent contracture of facial and oropharyngeal muscles when crying or being handled with puckering of lips and drooling of foamy saliva often associated with laryngospasm and respiratory distress; excessive startling and opisthotonus-like posturing with unexpected tactile or auditory stimuli; poor suck reflex and severely impaired swallowing; and a scaly erythematous rash. During the first decade of life, children with CISS/CS develop profuse sweating of the face, arms, and chest with ambient temperatures below 18º to 22º C, and with other stimuli including nervousness or ingestion of sweets. Affected individuals sweat very little in hot environments and may feel overheated. Progressive thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis occurs, requiring intervention in the second decade.
Pili torti-developmental delay-neurological abnormalities syndrome
MedGen UID:
342358
Concept ID:
C1849811
Disease or Syndrome
Abnormal hair, joint laxity, and developmental delay (HJDD) is characterized by normal hair at birth that gradually becomes sparse, twisted, brittle, and easily broken, with pili torti and trichorrhexis nodosa observed on light microscopy. Other features include increased joint mobility and cognitive delay (summary by Sharma et al., 2019).
Pelger-Huet-like anomaly and episodic fever with abdominal pain
MedGen UID:
376692
Concept ID:
C1850054
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-108 with autoinflammation (IMD108) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized mainly by features of autoinflammation, often manifest as onset of recurrent episodes of abdominal pain associated with fever and elevated inflammatory markers around adolescence. Affected individuals also have recurrent infections, particularly of the skin and nails; poor wound healing; and mild bleeding tendencies. Peripheral blood examination shows hypolobulated neutrophils, suggesting a defect in myeloid differentiation and function. However, neutrophil primary and secondary granules are normal (summary by Goos et al., 2019).
Familial Mediterranean fever, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
341987
Concept ID:
C1851347
Disease or Syndrome
Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is divided into two phenotypes: type 1 and type 2. FMF type 1 is characterized by recurrent short episodes of inflammation and serositis including fever, peritonitis, synovitis, pleuritis, and, rarely, pericarditis and meningitis. The symptoms and severity vary among affected individuals, sometimes even among members of the same family. Amyloidosis, which can lead to renal failure, is the most severe complication, if untreated. FMF type 2 is characterized by amyloidosis as the first clinical manifestation of FMF in an otherwise asymptomatic individual.
Dohle bodies and leukemia
MedGen UID:
346548
Concept ID:
C1857225
Neoplastic Process
Osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism, type 1
MedGen UID:
347149
Concept ID:
C1859452
Congenital Abnormality
Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I (MOPD1) is a severe autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by dwarfism, microcephaly, and neurologic abnormalities, including mental retardation, brain malformations, and ocular/auditory sensory deficits. Patients often die in early childhood (summary by Pierce and Morse, 2012).
Severe combined immunodeficiency, autosomal recessive, T cell-negative, B cell-negative, NK cell-negative, due to adenosine deaminase deficiency
MedGen UID:
354935
Concept ID:
C1863236
Disease or Syndrome
Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a systemic purine metabolic disorder that primarily affects lymphocyte development, viability, and function. The clinical phenotypic spectrum includes: Severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID), often diagnosed by age six months and usually by age 12 months; Less severe "delayed" onset combined immune deficiency (CID), usually diagnosed between age one and ten years; "Late/adult onset" CID, diagnosed in the second to fourth decades; Benign "partial ADA deficiency" (very low or absent ADA activity in erythrocytes but greater ADA activity in nucleated cells), which is compatible with normal immune function. Infants with typical early-onset ADA-deficient SCID have failure to thrive and opportunistic infections associated with marked depletion of T, B, and NK lymphocytes, and an absence of both humoral and cellular immune function. If immune function is not restored, children with ADA-deficient SCID rarely survive beyond age one to two years. Infections in delayed- and late-onset types (commonly, recurrent otitis, sinusitis, and upper respiratory) may initially be less severe than those in individuals with ADA-deficient SCID; however, by the time of diagnosis these individuals often have chronic pulmonary insufficiency and may have autoimmune phenomena (cytopenias, anti-thyroid antibodies), allergies, and elevated serum concentration of IgE. The longer the disorder goes unrecognized, the more immune function deteriorates and the more likely are chronic sequelae of recurrent infection.
Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 2
MedGen UID:
400366
Concept ID:
C1863727
Disease or Syndrome
Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis-2 (FHL2) is an autosomal recessive disorder of immune dysregulation with onset in infancy or early childhood. It is characterized clinically by fever, edema, hepatosplenomegaly, and liver dysfunction. Neurologic impairment, seizures, and ataxia are frequent. Laboratory studies show pancytopenia, coagulation abnormalities, hypofibrinogenemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. There is increased production of cytokines, such as gamma-interferon (IFNG; 147570) and TNF-alpha (191160), by hyperactivation and proliferation of T cells and macrophages. Activity of cytotoxic T cells and NK cells is reduced, consistent with a defect in cellular cytotoxicity. Bone marrow, lymph nodes, spleen, and liver show features of hemophagocytosis. Chemotherapy and/or immunosuppressant therapy may result in symptomatic remission, but the disorder is fatal without bone marrow transplantation (summary by Dufourcq-Lagelouse et al., 1999, Stepp et al., 1999, and Molleran Lee et al., 2004). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of FHL, see 267700.
Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 4
MedGen UID:
350245
Concept ID:
C1863728
Disease or Syndrome
Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a hyperinflammatory disorder clinically diagnosed based on the fulfillment of 5 of 8 criteria, including fever, splenomegaly, bicytopenia, hypertriglyceridemia and/or hypofibrinogenemia, hemophagocytosis, low or absent natural killer (NK) cell activity, hyperferritinemia, and high soluble IL2 receptor levels (IL2R; 147730). The disorder typically presents in infancy or early childhood. Persistent remission is rarely achieved with chemo- or immunotherapy; hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only cure (summary by Muller et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), see 267700.
Majeed syndrome
MedGen UID:
351273
Concept ID:
C1864997
Disease or Syndrome
Majeed syndrome (MJDS) is an autosomal recessive pediatric multisystem autoinflammatory disorder characterized by chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and congenital dyserythropoietic anemia; some patients may also develop neutrophilic dermatosis. Additional features may include fever, failure to thrive, and neutropenia. Laboratory studies show elevated inflammatory markers consistent with activation of the proinflammatory IL1 (147760) pathway (summary by Ferguson and El-Shanti, 2021). Genetic Heterogeneity of Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis See also CRMO2 (612852), caused by mutation in the IL1RN gene (147679) on chromosome 2q14; and CRMO3 (259680), caused by mutation in the IL1R1 gene (147810) on chromosome 2q12.
Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
435869
Concept ID:
C2673198
Disease or Syndrome
Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome-2 (FCAS2) is an autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder characterized by episodic and recurrent rash, urticaria, arthralgia, myalgia, and headache. In most patients, these episodes are accompanied by fever and serologic evidence of inflammation. Most, but not all, patients report exposure to cold as a trigger for the episodes. Additional features may include abdominal pain, thoracic pain, and sensorineural deafness. The age at onset is variable, ranging from the first year of life to middle age, and the severity and clinical manifestations are heterogeneous (summary by Shen et al., 2017). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, see FCAS1 (120100).
Combined immunodeficiency due to STIM1 deficiency
MedGen UID:
440575
Concept ID:
C2748557
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-10 (IMD10) is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by onset of recurrent infections in childhood due to defective T- and NK-cell function, although the severity is variable. Affected individuals may also have hypotonia, hypohidrosis, or dental enamel hypoplasia consistent with amelogenesis imperfecta (summary by Parry et al., 2016).
Combined immunodeficiency due to ORAI1 deficiency
MedGen UID:
440578
Concept ID:
C2748568
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-9 (IMD9) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early onset of recurrent infections due to defective T-cell activation. Affected individuals also have congenital myopathy resulting in muscle weakness as well as features of ectodermal dysplasia, including soft dental enamel (summary by McCarl et al., 2009).
Joubert syndrome 10
MedGen UID:
440688
Concept ID:
C2749019
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Joubert syndrome (JS) is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. Additional findings can include retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen.
Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 5
MedGen UID:
416514
Concept ID:
C2751293
Disease or Syndrome
Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis-5 with or without microvillus inclusion disease (FHL5) is an autosomal recessive hyperinflammatory disorder characterized clinically by fever, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, coagulation abnormalities, and other laboratory findings. Some patients have neurologic symptoms due to inflammatory CNS disease. There is uncontrolled and ineffective proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes, NK cells, and macrophages that infiltrate multiple organs, including liver, spleen, lymph nodes, and the CNS. The phenotype is variable: some patients may present in early infancy with severe diarrhea, prior to the onset of typical FHL features, whereas others present later in childhood and have a more protracted course without diarrhea. The early-onset diarrhea is due to enteropathy reminiscent of microvillus inclusion disease (see MVID, 251850). The enteropathy, which often necessitates parenteral feeding, may be the most life-threatening issue even after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). More variable features include sensorineural hearing loss and hypogammaglobulinemia. Treatment with immunosuppressive drugs and chemotherapy can ameliorate signs and symptoms of FHL in some patients, but the only curative therapy for FHL is HSCT. HSCT is not curative for enteropathy associated with the disorder, despite hematologic and immunologic reconstitution (summary by Meeths et al., 2010; Pagel et al., 2012; Stepensky et al., 2013). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL, HLH), see 267700.
Classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency
MedGen UID:
424833
Concept ID:
C2936858
Congenital Abnormality
21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) is the most common cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a family of autosomal recessive disorders involving impaired synthesis of cortisol from cholesterol by the adrenal cortex. In 21-OHD CAH, excessive adrenal androgen biosynthesis results in virilization in all individuals and salt wasting in some individuals. A classic form with severe enzyme deficiency and prenatal onset of virilization is distinguished from a non-classic form with mild enzyme deficiency and postnatal onset. The classic form is further divided into the simple virilizing form (~25% of affected individuals) and the salt-wasting form, in which aldosterone production is inadequate (=75% of individuals). Newborns with salt-wasting 21-OHD CAH are at risk for life-threatening salt-wasting crises. Individuals with the non-classic form of 21-OHD CAH present postnatally with signs of hyperandrogenism; females with the non-classic form are not virilized at birth.
Complement component 3 deficiency
MedGen UID:
462421
Concept ID:
C3151071
Disease or Syndrome
C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) is a complex ultra-rare complement-mediated renal disease caused by uncontrolled activation of the complement alternative pathway (AP) in the fluid phase (as opposed to cell surface) that is rarely inherited in a simple mendelian fashion. C3G affects individuals of all ages, with a median age at diagnosis of 23 years. Individuals with C3G typically present with hematuria, proteinuria, hematuria and proteinuria, acute nephritic syndrome or nephrotic syndrome, and low levels of the complement component C3. Spontaneous remission of C3G is uncommon, and about half of affected individuals develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD) within ten years of diagnosis, occasionally developing the late comorbidity of impaired visual acuity.
Lymphoproliferative syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
765548
Concept ID:
C3552634
Disease or Syndrome
Lymphoproliferative syndrome-1 is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by onset in early childhood of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated immune dysregulation, manifest as lymphoma, lymphomatoid granulomatosis, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, Hodgkin disease, and/or hypogammaglobulinemia. Autoimmune disorders, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia or renal disease, may also occur. Patients show a high EBV viral load and decreased invariant natural killer T cells. It is unknown whether patients with ITK mutations are intrinsically susceptible to development of lymphoma or dysgammaglobulinemia in the absence of EBV infection (summary by Stepensky et al., 2011; Linka et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lymphoproliferative syndrome, see XLP1 (308240).
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 4B
MedGen UID:
766851
Concept ID:
C3553937
Disease or Syndrome
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder-4B (PBD4B) includes the overlapping phenotypes of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD) and infantile Refsum disease (IRD), which represent milder manifestations of the Zellweger syndrome spectrum (ZSS) of peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBDs). The clinical course of patients with the NALD and IRD presentation is variable and may include developmental delay, hypotonia, liver dysfunction, sensorineural hearing loss, retinal dystrophy, and visual impairment. Children with the NALD presentation may reach their teens, and those with the IRD presentation may reach adulthood (summary by Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PBD(NALD/IRD), see 601539. Individuals with mutations in the PEX6 gene have cells of complementation group 4 (CG4, equivalent to CG6 and CGC). For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Combined immunodeficiency due to STK4 deficiency
MedGen UID:
766857
Concept ID:
C3553943
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-110 (IMD110) is an autosomal recessive primary T-cell immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by progressive loss of naive T cells, recurrent bacterial, viral, and fungal infections, warts, and abscesses, and autoimmune manifestations. Patients are at risk for developing lymphoproliferative disorders or lymphoma, particularly associated with EBV. Some patients may show cardiac malformations, including atrial septal defect (Abdollahpour et al., 2012; Nehme et al., 2012).
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
815495
Concept ID:
C3809165
Disease or Syndrome
Multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome-3 (MMDS3) is an autosomal recessive severe neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of previously acquired developmental milestones in the first months or years of life. Some affected patients have normal development in early infancy before the onset of symptoms, whereas others show delays from birth. Features included loss of motor function, spasticity, pyramidal signs, loss of speech, and cognitive impairment. The disease course is highly variable: some patients die of respiratory failure early in childhood, whereas some survive but may be bedridden with a feeding tube. Less commonly, some patients may survive and have a stable course with motor deficits and mild or even absent cognitive impairment, although there may be fluctuating symptoms, often in response to infection. Other variable features include visual problems and seizures. Brain imaging shows diffuse leukodystrophy in the subcortical region, brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cord. Laboratory studies tend to show increased lactate and CSF glycine, and decreased activity of mitochondrial complexes I and II, although these findings are also variable. There may be additional biochemical evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (summary by Liu et al., 2018). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome, see MMDS1 (605711).
Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, type III caused by mutation in PRKCD
MedGen UID:
816258
Concept ID:
C3809928
Disease or Syndrome
Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome type III is an autosomal recessive disorder of immune dysregulation. The phenotype is variable, but most patients have significant lymphadenopathy associated with variable autoimmune manifestations. Some patients may have recurrent infections. Lymphocyte accumulation results from a combination of impaired apoptosis and excessive proliferation (summary by Oliveira, 2013). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ALPS, see 601859.
Vasculitis due to ADA2 deficiency
MedGen UID:
854497
Concept ID:
C3887654
Disease or Syndrome
Adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency (DADA2) is a complex systemic autoinflammatory disorder in which vasculopathy/vasculitis, dysregulated immune function, and/or hematologic abnormalities may predominate. Inflammatory features include intermittent fevers, rash (often livedo racemosa/reticularis), and musculoskeletal involvement (myalgia/arthralgia, arthritis, myositis). Vasculitis, which usually begins before age ten years, may manifest as early-onset ischemic (lacunar) and/or hemorrhagic strokes, or as cutaneous or systemic polyarteritis nodosa. Hypertension and hepatosplenomegaly are often found. More severe involvement may lead to progressive central neurologic deficits (dysarthria, ataxia, cranial nerve palsies, cognitive impairment) or to ischemic injury to the kidney, intestine, and/or digits. Dysregulation of immune function can lead to immunodeficiency or autoimmunity of varying severity; lymphadenopathy may be present and some affected individuals have had lymphoproliferative disease. Hematologic disorders may begin early in life or in late adulthood, and can include lymphopenia, neutropenia, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, or pancytopenia. Of note, both interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variability (e.g., in age of onset, frequency and severity of manifestations) can be observed; also, individuals with biallelic ADA2 pathogenic variants may remain asymptomatic until adulthood or may never develop clinical manifestations of DADA2.
Polyglucosan body myopathy type 1
MedGen UID:
863042
Concept ID:
C4014605
Disease or Syndrome
Polyglucosan body myopathy-1 (PGBM1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset in childhood of progressive proximal muscle weakness, resulting in difficulties in ambulation. Most patients also develop progressive dilated cardiomyopathy, which may necessitate cardiac transplant in severe cases. A small subset of patients present with severe immunodeficiency and a hyperinflammatory state in very early childhood (summary by Boisson et al., 2012 and Nilsson et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Polyglucosan Body Myopathy See also PGBM2 (616199), caused by mutation in the GYG1 gene (603942) on chromosome 3q24.
STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy
MedGen UID:
863159
Concept ID:
C4014722
Disease or Syndrome
STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy is an autoinflammatory vasculopathy causing severe skin lesions, particularly affecting the face, ears, nose, and digits, and resulting in ulceration, eschar formation, necrosis, and, in some cases, amputation. Many patients have interstitial lung disease. Tissue biopsy and laboratory findings show a hyperinflammatory state, with evidence of increased beta-interferon (IFNB1; 147640) signaling (summary by Liu et al., 2014).
Periodic fever-infantile enterocolitis-autoinflammatory syndrome
MedGen UID:
863504
Concept ID:
C4015067
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammation with infantile enterocolitis is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by onset of recurrent flares of autoinflammation in early infancy. Affected individuals tend to have poor overall growth and gastrointestinal symptoms in infancy associated with laboratory evidence of activated inflammation. This initial presentation is followed by recurrent febrile episodes with splenomegaly and sometimes hematologic disturbances, arthralgias, or myalgias. The disorder results from overactivation of an arm of the immune response system (Romberg et al., 2014; Canna et al., 2014).
Autoinflammatory syndrome, familial, Behcet-like 1
MedGen UID:
898541
Concept ID:
C4225218
Disease or Syndrome
Familial Behcet-like autoinflammatory syndrome-1 (AIFBL1) is an autosomal dominant monogenic autoinflammatory disease characterized predominantly by painful and recurrent mucosal ulceration affecting the oral mucosa, gastrointestinal tract, and genital areas. The onset of symptoms is usually in the first decade, although later onset has been reported. Additional more variable features include skin rash, uveitis, and polyarthritis, consistent with a systemic hyperinflammatory state. Many patients have evidence of autoimmune disease. Rare patients may also have concurrent features of immunodeficiency, including recurrent infections with low numbers of certain white blood cells or impaired function of immune cells. The disorder results from a failure of mutant TNFAIP3 to suppress the activation of inflammatory cytokines in the NFKB (see 164011) signaling pathway; treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNFA; 191160) inhibitors may be beneficial. Although some of the clinical features of AIFBL1 resemble those of Behcet disease (109650), the more common form of Behcet disease is believed to be polygenic, typically shows later onset in early adulthood, and has symptoms usually restricted to the mucosa (summary by Zhou et al., 2016; Aeschlimann et al., 2018, and Kadowaki et al., 2018). Genetic Heterogeneity of AIFBL See also AIFBL2 (301074), caused by mutation in the ELF4 gene (300775) on chromosome Xq26, and AIFBL3 (618287), caused by mutation in the RELA gene (164014) on chromosome 11q13.
DOCK2 deficiency
MedGen UID:
901370
Concept ID:
C4225328
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-40 is an autosomal recessive primary form of combined immunodeficiency mainly affecting T-cell number and function, with other more variable defects in B-cell and NK-cell function. Patients have onset of severe invasive bacterial and viral infections in early childhood and may die without bone marrow transplantation (summary by Dobbs et al., 2015).
Infantile-onset periodic fever-panniculitis-dermatosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
934581
Concept ID:
C4310614
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammation, panniculitis, and dermatosis syndrome (AIPDS) is an autosomal recessive autoinflammatory disease characterized by neonatal onset of recurrent fever, erythematous rash with painful nodules, painful joints, and lipodystrophy. Additional features may include diarrhea, increased serum C-reactive protein (CRP), leukocytosis, and neutrophilia in the absence of any infection. Patients exhibit no overt primary immunodeficiency (Damgaard et al., 2016 and Zhou et al., 2016).
Yao syndrome
MedGen UID:
934587
Concept ID:
C4310620
Disease or Syndrome
Yao syndrome (YAOS) is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by periodic fever, dermatitis, arthritis, and swelling of the distal extremities, as well as gastrointestinal and sicca-like symptoms. The disorder is associated with specific NOD2 variants (and Shen, 2017).
Autoinflammation with arthritis and dyskeratosis
MedGen UID:
1380109
Concept ID:
C4479278
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammation with arthritis and dyskeratosis (AIADK) is characterized by recurrent fever, widespread skin dyskeratosis, arthritis, elevated biologic markers of inflammation, and mild autoimmunity with a high transitional B-cell level (summary by Grandemange et al., 2016).
Indifference to pain, congenital, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1613569
Concept ID:
C4538468
Disease or Syndrome
Marsili syndrome (MARSIS) is an autosomal dominant pain insensitivity disorder characterized by a lowered ability to sense pain, to experience temperature, and to sweat. Affected individuals do not perceive broken bones and burns as painful, and have lowered sensitivity to capsaicin. However, visceral pain (e.g., childbirth-related) and light touch are perceived (summary by Habib et al., 2018).
Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1647324
Concept ID:
C4551895
Disease or Syndrome
Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) are a group of conditions that have overlapping signs and symptoms and the same genetic cause. The group includes three conditions known as familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome type 1 (FCAS1), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disorder (NOMID). These conditions were once thought to be distinct disorders but are now considered to be part of the same condition spectrum. FCAS1 is the least severe form of CAPS, MWS is intermediate in severity, and NOMID is the most severe form.\n\nThe signs and symptoms of CAPS affect multiple body systems. Generally, CAPS are characterized by periodic episodes of skin rash, fever, and joint pain. These episodes can be triggered by exposure to cold temperatures, fatigue, other stressors, or they may arise spontaneously. Episodes can last from a few hours to several days. These episodes typically begin in infancy or early childhood and persist throughout life.\n\nWhile the CAPS spectrum shares similar signs and symptoms, the individual conditions tend to have distinct patterns of features. People with FCAS1 are particularly sensitive to the cold, and exposure to cold temperatures can trigger a painful or burning rash. The rash usually affects the torso and limbs but may spread to the rest of the body. In addition to fever and joint pain, other possible symptoms include muscle aches, chills, drowsiness, eye redness, headache, and nausea.\n\nIndividuals with MWS develop the typical periodic episodes of skin rash, fever, and joint pain after cold exposure, although episodes may occur spontaneously or all the time. Additionally, they can develop progressive hearing loss in their teenage years. Other features of MWS include skin lesions or kidney damage from abnormal deposits of a protein called amyloid (amyloidosis).\n\nIn people with NOMID, the signs and symptoms of the condition are usually present from birth and persists throughout life. In addition to skin rash and fever, affected individuals may have joint inflammation, swelling, and joint deformities called contractures that may restrict movement. People with NOMID typically have headaches, seizures, and cognitive impairment resulting from chronic meningitis, which is inflammation of the tissue that covers and protects the brain and spinal cord (meninges). Other features of NOMID include eye problems, short stature, distinctive facial features, and kidney damage caused by amyloidosis.
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1648310
Concept ID:
C4746851
Disease or Syndrome
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome-1 (PRAAS1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early childhood onset of annular erythematous plaques on the face and extremities with subsequent development of partial lipodystrophy and laboratory evidence of immune dysregulation. More variable features include recurrent fever, severe joint contractures, muscle weakness and atrophy, hepatosplenomegaly, basal ganglia calcifications, and microcytic anemia (summary by Agarwal et al., 2010; Kitamura et al., 2011; Arima et al., 2011). This disorder encompasses Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome (NKJO); joint contractures, muscular atrophy, microcytic anemia, and panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy (JMP syndrome); and chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature syndrome (CANDLE). Among Japanese patients, this disorder is best described as Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, since both Nakajo (1939) and Nishimura et al. (1950) contributed to the original phenotypic descriptions. Genetic Heterogeneity of Proteasome-Associated Autoinflammatory Syndrome See also PRAAS2 (618048), caused by mutation in the POMP gene (613386) on chromosome 13q12; PRAAS3 (617591), caused by mutation in the PSMB4 gene (602177) on chromosome 1q21; PRAAS4 (619183), caused by mutation in the PSMG2 gene (609702) on chromosome 18p11; PRAAS5 (619175), caused by mutation in the PSMB10 gene (176847) on chromosome 16q22; and PRAAS6 (620796), caused by mutation in the PSMB9 gene (177045) on chromosome 6p21.
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1648456
Concept ID:
C4747850
Disease or Syndrome
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome-3 is an autosomal recessive syndrome with onset in early infancy. Affected individuals present with nodular dermatitis, recurrent fever, myositis, panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy, lymphadenopathy, and dysregulation of the immune response, particularly associated with abnormal type I interferon-induced gene expression patterns. Additional features are highly variable, but may include joint contractures, hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, recurrent infections, autoantibodies, and hypergammaglobulinemia. Some patients may have intracranial calcifications (summary by Brehm et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PRAAS, see PRAAS1 (256040).
Retinal dystrophy, optic nerve edema, splenomegaly, anhidrosis, and migraine headache syndrome
MedGen UID:
1662266
Concept ID:
C4749914
Disease or Syndrome
Retinal dystrophy, optic nerve edema, splenomegaly, anhidrosis, and migraine headache syndrome (ROSAH) is an autosomal dominant disorder in which affected individuals present in childhood with reduced vision associated with papilledema and low-grade ocular inflammation. Progressive deterioration of visual acuity results in counting fingers to no light perception by the third decade of life. Patients also show anhidrosis, as well as splenomegaly and mild pancytopenia, and most experience headaches that may be migraine-like in nature (Williams et al., 2019).
NAD(P)HX dehydratase deficiency
MedGen UID:
1681210
Concept ID:
C5193026
Disease or Syndrome
Early-onset progressive encephalopathy with brain edema and/or leukoencephalopathy-2 (PEBEL2) is an autosomal recessive severe neurometabolic disorder characterized by rapidly progressive neurologic deterioration that is usually associated with a febrile illness. Affected infants tend to show normal early development followed by acute psychomotor regression with ataxia, hypotonia, and sometimes seizures, resulting in death in the first years of life. Brain imaging shows multiple abnormalities, including brain edema and signal abnormalities in the cortical and subcortical regions (summary by Van Bergen et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PEBEL, see PEBEL1 (617186).
Autoinflammation with episodic fever and lymphadenopathy
MedGen UID:
1719052
Concept ID:
C5394286
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammation with episodic fever and lymphadenopathy (AIEFL) is an autosomal dominant immunologic disorder characterized by onset of recurrent episodes of unexplained fever beginning in early infancy. The episodes occur in a cyclic pattern with a frequency of every week or every few weeks and a duration of several days. Patients have accompanying lymphadenopathy, and some may have hepatosplenomegaly. Rash and genital ulcers are not observed. Patient serum shows increased levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL6 (147620) and TNF (191160), consistent with abnormal activation of the innate inflammatory system. Treatment with anti-IL6R (147880) antibodies may result in clinical improvement (summary by Lalaoui et al., 2020).
Pseudo-TORCH syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1708513
Concept ID:
C5394391
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudo-TORCH syndrome-3 (PTORCH3) is an autosomal recessive disorder of immune dysregulation and neuroinflammation apparent from early infancy. Affected individuals have developmental delay with acute episodes of fever and multisystemic organ involvement, including coagulopathy, elevated liver enzymes, and proteinuria, often associated with thrombotic microangiopathy. Brain imaging shows progressive intracranial calcifications, white matter abnormalities, and sometimes cerebral or cerebellar atrophy. Laboratory studies show abnormal elevation of interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (ISG) transcripts consistent with a type I interferonopathy. The phenotype resembles the sequelae of intrauterine infection, but there is usually no evidence of an infectious agent. The disorder results from defects in negative regulation of the interferon immunologic pathway. Death in early childhood is common (summary by Duncan et al., 2019 and Gruber et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PTORCH, see PTORCH1 (251290).
X-linked lymphoproliferative disease due to SH2D1A deficiency
MedGen UID:
1770239
Concept ID:
C5399825
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) has two recognizable subtypes, XLP1 and XLP2. XLP1 is characterized predominantly by one of three commonly recognized phenotypes: Inappropriate immune response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection leading to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) or severe mononucleosis. Dysgammaglobulinemia. Lymphoproliferative disease (malignant lymphoma). XLP2 is most often characterized by HLH (often associated with EBV), dysgammaglobulinemia, and inflammatory bowel disease. HLH resulting from EBV infection is associated with an unregulated and exaggerated immune response with widespread proliferation of cytotoxic T cells, EBV-infected B cells, and macrophages. Dysgammaglobulinemia is typically hypogammaglobulinemia of one or more immunoglobulin subclasses. The malignant lymphomas are typically B-cell lymphomas, non-Hodgkin type, often extranodal, and in particular involving the intestine.
VEXAS syndrome
MedGen UID:
1765785
Concept ID:
C5435753
Disease or Syndrome
VEXAS (vacuoles, E1 enzyme, X-linked, autoinflammatory, somatic syndrome) is an adult-onset inflammatory disease that primarily affects males and is caused by somatic, not germline, mutations. The disorder is characterized by adult onset of rheumatologic symptoms at a mean age of 64 years. Features include recurrent fevers, pulmonary and dermatologic inflammatory manifestations, vasculitis, deep vein thrombosis, arthralgias, and ear and nose chondritis. Laboratory studies indicate hematologic abnormalities, including macrocytic anemia, as well as increased levels of acute-phase reactants; about half of patients have positive autoantibodies. Bone marrow biopsy shows degenerative vacuolization restricted to myeloid and erythroid precursor cells, as well as variable hematopoietic dyspoiesis and dysplasias. The condition does not respond to rheumatologic medications and the features may result in premature death (summary by Beck et al., 2020).
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
1780127
Concept ID:
C5543053
Disease or Syndrome
Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome-4 (PRAAS4) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by onset of panniculitis and erythematous skin lesions in early infancy. Additional features include hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, fever, generalized lipodystrophy, myositis, and joint contractures, as well as delayed motor and speech development. Autoimmune features, such as hemolytic anemia, may also occur. Laboratory studies show elevation of acute phase reactants and abnormal activation of the type I interferon response. Treatment with the JAK (see 147795) inhibitor ruxolitinib may result in clinical improvement (summary by de Jesus et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PRAAS, see PRAAS1 (256040).
Immunodeficiency 82 with systemic inflammation
MedGen UID:
1781752
Concept ID:
C5543581
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-82 with systemic inflammation (IMD82) is a complex autosomal dominant immunologic disorder characterized by recurrent infections with various organisms, as well as noninfectious inflammation manifest as lymphocytic organ infiltration with gastritis, colitis, and lung, liver, CNS, or skin disease. One of the more common features is inflammation of the stomach and bowel. Most patients develop symptoms in infancy or early childhood; the severity is variable. There may be accompanying fever, elevated white blood cell count, decreased B cells, hypogammaglobulinemia, increased C-reactive protein (CRP; 123260), and a generalized hyperinflammatory state. Immunologic workup shows variable B- and T-cell abnormalities such as skewed subgroups. Patients have a propensity for the development of lymphoma, usually in adulthood. At the molecular level, the disorder results from a gain-of-function mutation that leads to constitutive and enhanced activation of the intracellular inflammatory signaling pathway. Treatment with SYK inhibitors rescued human cell abnormalities and resulted in clinical improvement in mice (Wang et al., 2021).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 53
MedGen UID:
1779083
Concept ID:
C5543631
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-53 (COXPD53) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypomyelination, microcephaly, liver dysfunction, and recurrent autoinflammation (summary by Lausberg et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Nephronophthisis-like nephropathy 2
MedGen UID:
1794163
Concept ID:
C5561953
Disease or Syndrome
Nephronophthisis-like nephropathy-2 (NPHPL2) is an autosomal recessive cystic kidney disease characterized by onset of progressive renal insufficiency in the first decades of life. Renal imaging and biopsy show corticomedullary cysts, tubular ectasia, tubular basement membrane disruption, and tubulointerstitial infiltrations. Patients eventually progress to end-stage renal failure, necessitating kidney transplantation or dialysis (summary by Hurd et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nephronophthisis, see NPHP1 (256100).
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1794167
Concept ID:
C5561957
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities (DDISBA) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from early childhood. Intellectual disability can range from mild to severe. Additional variable features may include dysmorphic facial features, seizures, hypotonia, motor abnormalities such as Tourette syndrome or dystonia, and hearing loss (summary by Cousin et al., 2021).
Immunodeficiency 92
MedGen UID:
1794249
Concept ID:
C5562039
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-92 (IMD92) is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by the onset of recurrent infections in infancy or early childhood. Infectious agents are broad, including bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic, including Cryptosporidium and Mycobacteria. Patient lymphocytes show defects in both T- and B-cell proliferation, cytokine secretion, and overall function, and there is also evidence of dysfunction of NK, certain antigen-presenting cells, and myeloid subsets. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be curative (summary by Beaussant-Cohen et al., 2019 and Levy et al., 2021).
Immunodeficiency 87 and autoimmunity
MedGen UID:
1794280
Concept ID:
C5562070
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-87 and autoimmunity (IMD87) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder with wide phenotypic variation and severity. Affected individuals usually present in infancy or early childhood with increased susceptibility to infections, often Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), as well as with lymphadenopathy or autoimmune manifestations, predominantly hemolytic anemia. Laboratory studies may show low or normal lymphocyte numbers, often with skewed T-cell subset ratios. The disorder results primarily from defects in T-cell function, which causes both immunodeficiency and overall immune dysregulation (summary by Serwas et al., 2019 and Fournier et al., 2021).
Immunodeficiency 91 and hyperinflammation
MedGen UID:
1794283
Concept ID:
C5562073
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-91 and hyperinflammation (IMD91) is an autosomal recessive complex immunologic disorder characterized by both immunodeficiency and recurrent infections, often to viruses or mycobacteria, as well as by hyperinflammation with systemic involvement. Affected individuals present in infancy with variable features, including fever, infection, thrombocytopenia, renal or hepatic dysfunction, recurrent infections, or seizures. Most patients eventually develop hepatic or renal failure, compromised neurologic function, lymphadenopathy or hepatosplenomegaly, and multiorgan failure resulting in death. More variable features may include intermittent monocytosis, features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), and serologic evidence of hyperinflammation. The disorder is thought to result from dysregulation of the interferon response to viral stimulation in the innate immune system (summary by Le Voyer et al., 2021; Vavassori et al., 2021).
Severe combined immunodeficiency due to CD70 deficiency
MedGen UID:
1799982
Concept ID:
C5568559
Disease or Syndrome
Lymphoproliferative syndrome-3 (LPFS3) is an autosomal recessive early-onset immunologic disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in B cells, resulting in abnormal B-cell proliferation and increased susceptibility to B-cell malignancies, including Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients usually have hypogammaglobulinemia without lymphopenia, although some subsets of immune cells may be low and some patients may have recurrent infections. The disorder results from impaired signaling from proliferating B cells to effector T cells that provide immune surveillance. There may be an increased risk of solid tumors in heterozygous carriers (summary by Abolhassani et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lymphoproliferative syndrome, see XLP1 (308240).
Autoinflammatory syndrome, familial, X-linked, Behcet-like 2
MedGen UID:
1808082
Concept ID:
C5575495
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked familial Behcet-like autoinflammatory syndrome-2 (AIFBL2) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by the onset of inflammatory symptoms in the first decade of life in male patients. Affected males often present with oral mucosal ulceration and skin inflammation. More variable features may include gastrointestinal ulceration, arthritis, recurrent fevers, and iron deficiency anemia. Laboratory studies are consistent with immune dysregulation manifest as increased inflammatory markers and variable immune cell abnormalities, such as decreased NK cells and low memory B cells. One patient presented with recurrent infections and immunodeficiency in addition to autoinflammation. The disorder results from a defect in ELF4, which normally acts as a negative regulator of inflammatory disease. Symptoms may respond to blockade of IL1 (see 147760) or TNFA (191160) (summary by Tyler et al., 2021 and Sun et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of AIFBL, see AIFBL1 (616744).
Systemic lupus erythematosus 17
MedGen UID:
1804329
Concept ID:
C5676884
Disease or Syndrome
Systemic lupus erythematosus-17 (SLE17) is an X-linked dominant autoimmune disorder characterized by onset of systemic autoinflammatory symptoms in the first decades of life. Only affected females have been reported. Features may include classic features of SLE, such as malar rash and arthralgias, or can include less common entities such as hemiplegia and neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Laboratory studies show the presence of autoantibodies and enhanced NFKB (164011) signaling, the latter being consistent with a gain-of-function effect (Brown et al., 2022). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), see 152700.
Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1803541
Concept ID:
C5676888
Disease or Syndrome
Stuve-Wiedemann syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bowing of the long bones and other skeletal anomalies, episodic hyperthermia, respiratory distress, and feeding difficulties usually resulting in early death (Dagoneau et al., 2004). See also 'classic' Schwartz-Jampel syndrome type 1 (SJS1; 255800), a phenotypically similar but genetically distinct disorder caused by mutation in the HSPG2 gene (142461) on chromosome 1p36. Genetic Heterogeneity of Stuve-Wiedemann Syndrome Stuve-Wiedemann syndrome-2 (STWS2; 619751) is caused by mutation in the IL6ST gene (600694) on chromosome 5q11.
Immunodeficiency 95
MedGen UID:
1802205
Concept ID:
C5676929
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-95 (IMD95) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized predominantly by the onset of recurrent and severe viral respiratory infections in infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals often require hospitalization or respiratory support for these infections, which include human rhinovirus (HRV) and RSV. Immunologic workup is usually normal, although some mild abnormalities may be observed. The disorder results from a loss of ability of the innate immune system to sense viral genetic information, which causes a lack of interferon (IFN) production, poor response to viral and immunologic stimulation, and failure to control viral replication (summary by Lamborn et al., 2017, Asgari et al., 2017, Cananzi et al., 2021).
Autoinflammatory-pancytopenia syndrome due to DNASE2 deficiency
MedGen UID:
1803642
Concept ID:
C5676977
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammatory-pancytopenia syndrome (AIPCS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe anemia and thrombocytopenia apparent from early infancy, hepatosplenomegaly, and recurrent fevers associated with a hyperinflammatory state. Additional systemic features may include chronic diarrhea, proteinuria with renal disease, liver fibrosis with elevated liver enzymes, deforming arthropathy, and vasculitic skin lesions. Some patients may have motor delay or learning difficulties associated with subcortical white matter lesions on brain imaging. Laboratory studies show increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and increased expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), consistent with a type I interferonopathy (Rodero et al., 2017). Treatment with a JAK (see 147795) inhibitor (baricitinib) may be effective (Hong et al., 2020).
Liver disease, severe congenital
MedGen UID:
1823968
Concept ID:
C5774195
Disease or Syndrome
Severe congenital liver disease (SCOLIV) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the onset of progressive hepatic dysfunction usually in the first years of life. Affected individuals show feeding difficulties with failure to thrive and features such as jaundice, hepatomegaly, and abdominal distension. Laboratory workup is consistent with hepatic insufficiency and may also show coagulation defects, anemia, or metabolic disturbances. Cirrhosis and hypernodularity are commonly observed on liver biopsy. Many patients die of liver failure in early childhood (Moreno Traspas et al., 2022).
Hypermetabolism due to uncoupled mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation 2
MedGen UID:
1824010
Concept ID:
C5774237
Disease or Syndrome
Hypermetabolism due to uncoupled mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation-2 (HUMOP2) is characterized by failure to thrive apparent in infancy despite adequate caloric intake. Affected individuals show normal thyroid function, hyperphagia, tachypnea, increased basal temperature, and increased sweating. Biochemical studies demonstrate increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption with inefficient production of ATP in the final steps of oxidative phosphorylation due to an uncoupling defect (Ganetzky et al., 2022). Genetic Heterogeneity of Hypermetabolism due to Uncoupled Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation See also HUMOP1 (238800).
Tessadori-Van Haaften neurodevelopmental syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
1824083
Concept ID:
C5774310
Disease or Syndrome
Tessadori-Bicknell-van Haaften neurodevelopmental syndrome-3 (TEBIVANED3) is characterized by global developmental delay with poor overall growth, impaired intellectual development, and speech difficulties. More variable features include hypotonia, microcephaly, and dysmorphic facies. The severity and manifestations of the disorder are highly variable (Tessadori et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Tessadori-Bicknell-van Haaften neurodevelopmental disorder, see TEBIVANED1 (619758).
Hatipoglu immunodeficiency syndrome
MedGen UID:
1841075
Concept ID:
C5830439
Disease or Syndrome
Hatipoglu immunodeficiency syndrome (HATIS) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by childhood onset of failure to thrive, skin manifestations, pancytopenia, and susceptibility to recurrent infections (Harapas et al., 2022).
Autoimmune disease, multisystem, infantile-onset, 3
MedGen UID:
1841236
Concept ID:
C5830600
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile-onset multisystem autoimmune disease-3 (ADMIO3) is an autosomal recessive disorder of immune dysregulation characterized by the onset of various systemic autoimmune manifestations in the first months or years of life. Features may include hypothyroidism, type 1 diabetes mellitus, systemic inflammatory manifestations (fever, hepatomegaly), and autoimmune cytopenias. Laboratory studies show normal levels of T, B, and NK cells, but CD4+ (see 186940) T cells demonstrate hyperproliferation when stimulated in vitro (Janssen et al., 2022). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ADMIO, see ADMIO1 (615952).
Immunodeficiency 118
MedGen UID:
1852539
Concept ID:
C5882665
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked recessive immunodeficiency-118 (IMD118) is characterized by increased susceptibility to the development of disseminated mycobacterial infections in infancy, notably after BCG vaccination. Affected males usually recover with treatment, have no other infections, and show normal growth and development. Immunologic workup shows normal numbers of circulating leukocyte subsets, but functional studies show impaired JAK2 (147796) translation in certain T lymphocytes, resulting in defective IL23 (see 605580)-dependent induction of IFNG (147570) production and secretion from other immune cells (Bohlen et al., 2023).
Immunodeficiency 114, folate-responsive
MedGen UID:
1848890
Concept ID:
C5882719
Disease or Syndrome
Folate-responsive immunodeficiency-114 (IMD114) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by the onset of oral ulcers and recurrent skin and respiratory infections in early infancy. Affected individuals have lip fissures, skin sores and abscesses, genital dermatitis, chronic diarrhea, and poor overall growth. Laboratory studies show megaloblastic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and lymphopenia with decreased Ig levels. Some individuals have global developmental delay, often with brain imaging abnormalities. Treatment with folic acid supplementation results in significant clinical improvement of the hematologic and immunologic abnormalities, although neurologic abnormalities, if already present, do not respond to treatment. Early intervention and treatment with folic acid supplementation may prevent or delay neurologic deficits in affected infants (Gok et al., 2023; Shiraishi et al., 2023).
Immunodeficiency 115 with autoinflammation
MedGen UID:
1847791
Concept ID:
C5882724
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-115 with autoinflammation (IMD115) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the onset of symptoms of immune dysregulation in early infancy. Affected individuals have immunodeficiency with recurrent bacterial, viral, and fungal infections, as well as autoinflammatory features, including arthritis and dermatitis. Some patients may have more systemic involvement, such as myopathy, gastrointestinal abnormalities, and anemia. Laboratory studies show variable B-cell and T-cell defects, sometimes with defective antibody responses and hypogammaglobulinemia (Boisson et al., 2015; Oda et al., 2019).
GTP cyclohydrolase I deficiency with hyperphenylalaninemia
MedGen UID:
988270
Concept ID:
CN305333
Disease or Syndrome
GTP-cyclohydrolase I deficiency, an autosomal recessive genetic disorder, is one of the causes of malignant hyperphenylalaninemia due to tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency. Not only does tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency cause hyperphenylalaninemia, it is also responsible for defective neurotransmission of monoamines because of malfunctioning tyrosine and tryptophan hydroxylases, both tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent hydroxylases.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Amarilyo G, Rothman D, Manthiram K, Edwards KM, Li SC, Marshall GS, Yildirim-Toruner C, Haines K, Ferguson PJ, Lionetti G, Cherian J, Zhao Y, DeLaMora P, Syverson G, Nativ S, Twilt M, Michelow IC, Stepanovskiy Y, Thatayatikom A, Harel L, Akoghlanian S, Tucker L, Marques MC, Srinivasalu H, Propst EJ, Licameli GR, Dedeoglu F, Lapidus S; CARRA PFAPA Consensus Treatment Plan Workgroup
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J 2020 Apr 15;18(1):31. doi: 10.1186/s12969-020-00424-x. PMID: 32293478Free PMC Article
Gattorno M, Hofer M, Federici S, Vanoni F, Bovis F, Aksentijevich I, Anton J, Arostegui JI, Barron K, Ben-Cherit E, Brogan PA, Cantarini L, Ceccherini I, De Benedetti F, Dedeoglu F, Demirkaya E, Frenkel J, Goldbach-Mansky R, Gul A, Hentgen V, Hoffman H, Kallinich T, Kone-Paut I, Kuemmerle-Deschner J, Lachmann HJ, Laxer RM, Livneh A, Obici L, Ozen S, Rowczenio D, Russo R, Shinar Y, Simon A, Toplak N, Touitou I, Uziel Y, van Gijn M, Foell D, Garassino C, Kastner D, Martini A, Sormani MP, Ruperto N; Eurofever Registry and the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO)
Ann Rheum Dis 2019 Aug;78(8):1025-1032. Epub 2019 Apr 24 doi: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-215048. PMID: 31018962
Fujita H, Terui T, Hayama K, Akiyama M, Ikeda S, Mabuchi T, Ozawa A, Kanekura T, Kurosawa M, Komine M, Nakajima K, Sano S, Nemoto O, Muto M, Imai Y, Yamanishi K, Aoyama Y, Iwatsuki K; Japanese Dermatological Association Guidelines Development Committee for the Guidelines for the Management and Treatment of Generalized Pustular Psoriasis
J Dermatol 2018 Nov;45(11):1235-1270. Epub 2018 Sep 19 doi: 10.1111/1346-8138.14523. PMID: 30230572

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Wang HF
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J 2022 Feb 5;20(1):9. doi: 10.1186/s12969-022-00669-8. PMID: 35123508Free PMC Article
Meier-Schiesser B, French LE
J Dtsch Dermatol Ges 2021 Mar;19(3):400-426. Epub 2021 Feb 23 doi: 10.1111/ddg.14332. PMID: 33620111
Amarilyo G, Rothman D, Manthiram K, Edwards KM, Li SC, Marshall GS, Yildirim-Toruner C, Haines K, Ferguson PJ, Lionetti G, Cherian J, Zhao Y, DeLaMora P, Syverson G, Nativ S, Twilt M, Michelow IC, Stepanovskiy Y, Thatayatikom A, Harel L, Akoghlanian S, Tucker L, Marques MC, Srinivasalu H, Propst EJ, Licameli GR, Dedeoglu F, Lapidus S; CARRA PFAPA Consensus Treatment Plan Workgroup
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J 2020 Apr 15;18(1):31. doi: 10.1186/s12969-020-00424-x. PMID: 32293478Free PMC Article
Gattorno M, Hofer M, Federici S, Vanoni F, Bovis F, Aksentijevich I, Anton J, Arostegui JI, Barron K, Ben-Cherit E, Brogan PA, Cantarini L, Ceccherini I, De Benedetti F, Dedeoglu F, Demirkaya E, Frenkel J, Goldbach-Mansky R, Gul A, Hentgen V, Hoffman H, Kallinich T, Kone-Paut I, Kuemmerle-Deschner J, Lachmann HJ, Laxer RM, Livneh A, Obici L, Ozen S, Rowczenio D, Russo R, Shinar Y, Simon A, Toplak N, Touitou I, Uziel Y, van Gijn M, Foell D, Garassino C, Kastner D, Martini A, Sormani MP, Ruperto N; Eurofever Registry and the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO)
Ann Rheum Dis 2019 Aug;78(8):1025-1032. Epub 2019 Apr 24 doi: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-215048. PMID: 31018962
Brouwer MC, McIntyre P, Prasad K, van de Beek D
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2015 Sep 12;2015(9):CD004405. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD004405.pub5. PMID: 26362566Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Broderick L, Hoffman HM
Nat Rev Rheumatol 2022 Aug;18(8):448-463. Epub 2022 Jun 21 doi: 10.1038/s41584-022-00797-1. PMID: 35729334Free PMC Article
Batu ED, Basaran O, Bilginer Y, Ozen S
Curr Rheumatol Rep 2022 Jun;24(6):206-212. Epub 2022 Apr 18 doi: 10.1007/s11926-022-01073-7. PMID: 35435612
Wang HF
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J 2022 Feb 5;20(1):9. doi: 10.1186/s12969-022-00669-8. PMID: 35123508Free PMC Article
Meier-Schiesser B, French LE
J Dtsch Dermatol Ges 2021 Mar;19(3):400-426. Epub 2021 Feb 23 doi: 10.1111/ddg.14332. PMID: 33620111
Yurdakul S, Yazici H
Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol 2008 Oct;22(5):793-809. doi: 10.1016/j.berh.2008.08.005. PMID: 19028364

Therapy

Amarilyo G, Rothman D, Manthiram K, Edwards KM, Li SC, Marshall GS, Yildirim-Toruner C, Haines K, Ferguson PJ, Lionetti G, Cherian J, Zhao Y, DeLaMora P, Syverson G, Nativ S, Twilt M, Michelow IC, Stepanovskiy Y, Thatayatikom A, Harel L, Akoghlanian S, Tucker L, Marques MC, Srinivasalu H, Propst EJ, Licameli GR, Dedeoglu F, Lapidus S; CARRA PFAPA Consensus Treatment Plan Workgroup
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J 2020 Apr 15;18(1):31. doi: 10.1186/s12969-020-00424-x. PMID: 32293478Free PMC Article
Gattorno M, Hofer M, Federici S, Vanoni F, Bovis F, Aksentijevich I, Anton J, Arostegui JI, Barron K, Ben-Cherit E, Brogan PA, Cantarini L, Ceccherini I, De Benedetti F, Dedeoglu F, Demirkaya E, Frenkel J, Goldbach-Mansky R, Gul A, Hentgen V, Hoffman H, Kallinich T, Kone-Paut I, Kuemmerle-Deschner J, Lachmann HJ, Laxer RM, Livneh A, Obici L, Ozen S, Rowczenio D, Russo R, Shinar Y, Simon A, Toplak N, Touitou I, Uziel Y, van Gijn M, Foell D, Garassino C, Kastner D, Martini A, Sormani MP, Ruperto N; Eurofever Registry and the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO)
Ann Rheum Dis 2019 Aug;78(8):1025-1032. Epub 2019 Apr 24 doi: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2019-215048. PMID: 31018962
De Benedetti F, Gattorno M, Anton J, Ben-Chetrit E, Frenkel J, Hoffman HM, Koné-Paut I, Lachmann HJ, Ozen S, Simon A, Zeft A, Calvo Penades I, Moutschen M, Quartier P, Kasapcopur O, Shcherbina A, Hofer M, Hashkes PJ, Van der Hilst J, Hara R, Bujan-Rivas S, Constantin T, Gul A, Livneh A, Brogan P, Cattalini M, Obici L, Lheritier K, Speziale A, Junge G
N Engl J Med 2018 May 17;378(20):1908-1919. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1706314. PMID: 29768139
Barut K, Adrovic A, Şahin S, Kasapçopur Ö
Balkan Med J 2017 Apr 5;34(2):90-101. doi: 10.4274/balkanmedj.2017.0111. PMID: 28418334Free PMC Article
Brouwer MC, McIntyre P, Prasad K, van de Beek D
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2015 Sep 12;2015(9):CD004405. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD004405.pub5. PMID: 26362566Free PMC Article

Prognosis

Kozycki CT, Kodati S, Huryn L, Wang H, Warner BM, Jani P, Hammoud D, Abu-Asab MS, Jittayasothorn Y, Mattapallil MJ, Tsai WL, Ullah E, Zhou P, Tian X, Soldatos A, Moutsopoulos N, Kao-Hsieh M, Heller T, Cowen EW, Lee CR, Toro C, Kalsi S, Khavandgar Z, Baer A, Beach M, Long Priel D, Nehrebecky M, Rosenzweig S, Romeo T, Deuitch N, Brenchley L, Pelayo E, Zein W, Sen N, Yang AH, Farley G, Sweetser DA, Briere L, Yang J, de Oliveira Poswar F, Schwartz IVD, Silva Alves T, Dusser P, Koné-Paut I, Touitou I, Titah SM, van Hagen PM, van Wijck RTA, van der Spek PJ, Yano H, Benneche A, Apalset EM, Jansson RW, Caspi RR, Kuhns DB, Gadina M, Takada H, Ida H, Nishikomori R, Verrecchia E, Sangiorgi E, Manna R, Brooks BP, Sobrin L, Hufnagel RB, Beck D, Shao F, Ombrello AK, Aksentijevich I, Kastner DL; Undiagnosed Diseases Network
Ann Rheum Dis 2022 Oct;81(10):1453-1464. Epub 2022 Jul 22 doi: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2022-222629. PMID: 35868845Free PMC Article
Miura M
Int J Rheum Dis 2018 Jan;21(1):70-75. Epub 2017 Nov 3 doi: 10.1111/1756-185X.13209. PMID: 29105310
Barut K, Adrovic A, Şahin S, Kasapçopur Ö
Balkan Med J 2017 Apr 5;34(2):90-101. doi: 10.4274/balkanmedj.2017.0111. PMID: 28418334Free PMC Article
Khairy S, Azzubi M
World Neurosurg 2017 May;101:811.e7-811.e8. Epub 2017 Feb 27 doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2017.02.074. PMID: 28245993
Simon A, Asli B, Braun-Falco M, De Koning H, Fermand JP, Grattan C, Krause K, Lachmann H, Lenormand C, Martinez-Taboada V, Maurer M, Peters M, Rizzi R, Rongioletti F, Ruzicka T, Schnitzler L, Schubert B, Sibilia J, Lipsker D
Allergy 2013;68(5):562-8. Epub 2013 Mar 9 doi: 10.1111/all.12129. PMID: 23480774

Clinical prediction guides

Fardeau C, Alafaleq M, Dhaenens CM, Dollfus H, Koné-Paut I, Grunewald O, Morel JB, Titah C, Saadoun D, Lazeran PO, Meunier I
Clin Genet 2023 Apr;103(4):453-458. Epub 2022 Dec 30 doi: 10.1111/cge.14286. PMID: 36543582
Kadowaki T, Kadowaki S, Ohnishi H
Front Immunol 2021;12:780689. Epub 2021 Nov 26 doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2021.780689. PMID: 34899744Free PMC Article
Sicignano LL, Rigante D, Moccaldi B, Massaro MG, Delli Noci S, Patisso I, Capozio G, Verrecchia E, Manna R
Adv Ther 2021 Feb;38(2):1078-1093. Epub 2020 Dec 14 doi: 10.1007/s12325-020-01576-8. PMID: 33315168
Miura M
Int J Rheum Dis 2018 Jan;21(1):70-75. Epub 2017 Nov 3 doi: 10.1111/1756-185X.13209. PMID: 29105310
Brouwer MC, McIntyre P, Prasad K, van de Beek D
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2015 Sep 12;2015(9):CD004405. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD004405.pub5. PMID: 26362566Free PMC Article

Recent systematic reviews

Maccora I, Maniscalco V, Campani S, Carrera S, Abbati G, Marrani E, Mastrolia MV, Simonini G
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2023 May 13;18(1):117. doi: 10.1186/s13023-023-02721-6. PMID: 37179309Free PMC Article
Yan R, Cao W, Liu X, Li F, Shen M
Clin Rheumatol 2020 Dec;39(12):3847-3852. Epub 2020 Jun 9 doi: 10.1007/s10067-020-05204-2. PMID: 32519052
Brouwer MC, McIntyre P, Prasad K, van de Beek D
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2015 Sep 12;2015(9):CD004405. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD004405.pub5. PMID: 26362566Free PMC Article
Brouwer MC, McIntyre P, Prasad K, van de Beek D
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2013 Jun 4;(6):CD004405. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD004405.pub4. PMID: 23733364
Brouwer MC, McIntyre P, de Gans J, Prasad K, van de Beek D
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2010 Sep 8;(9):CD004405. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD004405.pub3. PMID: 20824838

Supplemental Content

Table of contents

    Clinical resources

    Practice guidelines

    • PubMed
      See practice and clinical guidelines in PubMed. The search results may include broader topics and may not capture all published guidelines. See the FAQ for details.
    • Bookshelf
      See practice and clinical guidelines in NCBI Bookshelf. The search results may include broader topics and may not capture all published guidelines. See the FAQ for details.

    Consumer resources

    Recent activity

    Your browsing activity is empty.

    Activity recording is turned off.

    Turn recording back on

    See more...